The radicalism of fools

Long-read

The radicalism of fools

Why today’s leftists are so pre-disposed to anti-Semitism.

Daniel Ben-Ami

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How deep does anti-Semitism run in the Labour Party? One of the few points on which there is consensus – from the Labour leadership itself to its harshest critics – is that the party contains some anti-Semites. But the debate about the prevalence and significance of anti-Semitism within Labour still rages.

The recent submission on the subject by the Jewish Labour Movement, an organisation established in 1903 and affiliated to the Labour Party since 1920, certainly makes for grim reading. The 53-page dossier submitted to the Equality and Human Rights Commission, an official government body, documents numerous types of anti-Semitism inside the Labour Party, including verbal and online abuse of Jewish members; the exclusion of Jewish members from participating in party activity; the failure to implement procedure to protect Jewish members from anti-Semitism; hostile responses to those calling out anti-Semitism; and the appointment of anti-Semites to positions of power.

While these are serious charges, it should not be accepted without question that anti-Semitism is widespread in Labour. No doubt some of Jeremy Corbyn’s opponents within the party want such allegations to discredit his leadership. It is also true that supporters of other parties have an interest in undermining Labour. Both sets of critics are clearly willing to publicise any instances of anti-Semitism widely. The charges against Labour therefore demand closer investigation.

The official Labour Party line is of course that it abhors all forms of racism, including anti-Semitism. It also insists it will take firm action against anyone propagating such views. Some Jewish members of the Labour Party support the leadership in its stance.

One line of defence for Labour is to suggest that anti-Semitism in the party reflects a broader trend across society. There is certainly evidence that lends credence to this view. For example, a recent survey conducted on behalf of the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism by YouGov, and analysed by Daniel Allington, a lecturer at King’s College London, found that anti-Semitic views exist among a significant minority in British society. The pollsters asked a representative sample of adults how they would react to different anti-Semitic tropes. The results were worrying. For instance, five per cent of the British population said the statement that ‘British Jewish people chase money more than other British people’, was ‘definitely true’, while another 15 per cent said it was ‘probably true’. Similarly four per cent said it was ‘definitely true’ that Jewish people have too much power in the media while 10 per cent said it was ‘probably true’.

Anti-Semitism has become central to the identity of many of today’s self-proclaimed radicals

A parallel survey included in the same report showed striking levels of fear among Britain’s Jewish population. For example, 42 per cent of Jews have considered leaving the country, of which 85 per cent pointed to anti-Semitism in politics as a reason.

As with all surveys, such results have to be treated with caution. For instance, many religious Jewish men still seem comfortable walking the streets wearing kippot (skullcaps). Physical attacks on Jews do happen, such as the recent beating of a rabbi in London’s Stamford Hill district, but they are mercifully rare. The two teenagers reportedly responsible are said to have shouted ‘kill Jews’ and ‘fuck Jews’.

However, there are several reasons why the official Labour defence that anti-Semitism in its ranks merely reflects wider society is not convincing. For one thing, Labour makes great play of being an anti-racist party. It is all too quick to condemn what it sees as racism perpetrated by other organisations or individuals. Yet, to put it mildly, the prevalence of anti-Semitism in its ranks suggests a blind spot towards hatred of Jews.

There is also a strong case to be made that anti-Semitism in the Labour Party permeates from the leadership downwards. This was the claim made by Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, who represents Britain’s orthodox Jewish congregations, in The Times. He argued that ‘a new poison – sanctioned from the very top – has taken root in the Labour Party’.

The Jewish Labour Movement report also includes the claim that the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has frequently signalled that anti-Semitic views are acceptable. For example, he infamously supported the artist Mear One, after he painted a mural in East London containing several anti-Semitic tropes. These included a depiction of hook-nosed bankers playing Monopoly on the backs of the world’s poor. Once publicly exposed, Corbyn took four days to apologise, claiming he did not look closely enough at the mural.

In another incident in August 2018, a video emerged showing Corbyn in Tunis in 2014, laying a wreath on the grave of the Black September terrorists responsible for murdering Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. At first Corbyn claimed he ‘was present, but not involved’. When video footage appeared to prove otherwise, he made no further comment. Several other instances are included in the report, and spiked has also commented on the same subject.

However, to understand contemporary anti-Semitism it is necessary to go beyond pointing to its explicit instances, even among the Labour leadership. The problem today runs much deeper. Anti-Semitism has become central to the identity of many of today’s self-proclaimed radicals. In some cases, this echoes old themes, some of which would have been recognisable in the 19th century. But this anti-Semitism also expresses new developments in politics.

To grapple with this question it helps first to take a step back to central Europe in the late 19th century. Back then, the term ‘socialism of fools’ was coined to describe rising anti-Semitism. It is often attributed to August Bebel, the leader of Germany’s Social Democratic Party, but others say it originated with Ferdinand Kronawetter, a leftist Austrian politician. According to a study by Peter Pulzer, the full saying was: ‘der Sozialismus des dummen Kerls von Wien’ (‘the socialism of fools from Vienna’).

Supporters of the socialism of fools saw capitalism not as a flawed social system, but as a giant conspiracy manipulated by all-powerful Jews

At that time, genuine socialist movements were emerging in central Europe. Their overriding goal was to replace capitalism, the form of society based on production for profit, with one based on social need. It is not necessary to share their worldview to see that they were generally acting in good faith. They believed that the replacement of a market economy with a different form of economic organisation would benefit the mass of society.

Running parallel to the emergence of mass socialist parties was a rising anti-Semitism, which conformed to a caricature of socialism. Supporters of the socialism of fools saw capitalism not as a flawed social system, but as a giant conspiracy manipulated by all-powerful Jews. In this nightmare vision, the world was controlled by an unholy alliance of international Jewish bankers and Jewish leftists. Both sets of Jews were charged with working together to undermine the mass of the population.

The socialism of fools achieved its most brutal form in the German Nazi party, in the first half of the 20th century. National Socialists, as they called themselves, had no hesitation in using extreme physical violence against genuine socialists and communists. Indeed, many leftists ended up in concentration camps. At the same time, the Nazis were avid proponents of the idea that the world was controlled by a global Jewish conspiracy. Anti-Semitism was a central element of Nazi ideology.

Clearly, the political situation today is very different to that of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, today’s anti-Semitism shares some common elements with its earlier form.

A key development from the late 1980s onwards was the almost universal acceptance that there is no alternative to the market. Almost everyone, even those who define themselves as socialists, accepted that the only viable economy is based on production for profit. Under such circumstances, traditional socialism, in the sense of the abolition of the market economy and its replacement with a different social system, had lost credibility. The old-style socialist movement was no more.

However, since the 1990s a new form of ‘anti-capitalism’ has emerged, sometimes referring to itself as the ‘anti-globalisation’ movement or as a campaign for social justice. In important respects, it reproduces some of the old anti-Semitic tropes. As Tim Black has recently argued on spiked, the anti-capitalist perspective relies heavily on the idea that the world is controlled by conspiracies. It also lays great emphasis on the role of international bankers in manipulating the economy and society more generally. Many supporters of this outlook would recoil at the idea that they are hostile to Jews, but acceptance of this worldview predisposes its adherents to key anti-Semitic themes.

Delegates at the Labour Party conference wave Palestinian flags, 25 September 2018.
Delegates at the Labour Party conference wave Palestinian flags, 25 September 2018.

Compounding this degraded form of anti-capitalism is the rise of identity politics. At a time when identity is politicised, it has become increasingly common to portray Jews ‘as powerful, privileged and the aggressor’. In this worldview Jews become not a group that has suffered oppression, but the embodiment of ‘white privilege’. So anti-Semitism comes to be seen, not as a form of discrimination, but as a radical act.

Echoes of this worldview were apparent in one of Labour’s election campaign videos celebrating diversity as the party’s strength. The clip featured virtually every group that could reasonably be seen as the victim of some form of discrimination – including LGBT+, gays, Travellers, Muslims, Sikhs, Christians, blacks, Asians, the disabled, the elderly, the young, the working class and carers. But not Jews. For some reason Jews were not included in the list of those the video said would be worthy of equality, dignity and respect, and therefore valued by a Labour government. Evidently, Jews are not eligible to be, as Labour puts it, their ‘authentic selves’.

Of course, no discussion of contemporary anti-Semitism can be complete without reference to Israel. Some of this debate is well-worn but it is easy to miss the new ground that is apparent here, too. Clearly, it is widely accepted, including among the vast majority of British Jews, that it is legitimate to criticise Israeli policies. There is much about Israel’s occupation of the West Bank and treatment of Gaza that is worthy of criticism. But all too often criticism of Israel is used as a coded way of attacking Jews. Israel is subject to incredible double standards. It is criticised for actions for which other nations around the world get a free pass. For example, Israel is criticised for the separation wall that runs through the West Bank, yet few condemn ‘Fortress Europe’, the ring of defences around the European Union that restrict freedom of movement on a far greater scale.

Another way in which such double standards are expressed is through the notion of Israeli ‘apartheid’. It is important to recognise that this criticism is not based on an understanding of the old discriminatory regime in South Africa. Most proponents of this charge probably cannot even pronounce ‘apartheid’ properly. Rather, it is a moral category. It expresses the idea that Israel should be singled out for its actions. In this sense, the Israeli state is seen as uniquely evil.

From such a starting point, the proponents of BDS (Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions) feel obliged to single out Israel for their campaigns. Criticising Israel above all other nations becomes a central element of this warped form of radical identity. Boycotts of Israeli products, or Israeli culture, provide them with a high-profile opportunity for virtue-signalling.

There is also a new element to anti-Israel criticism that demands further attention. The existence of nation states is increasingly frowned on by elites. Instead, they see themselves as cosmopolitans who prefer trans-national organisations, such as the EU. Under such circumstances, Israel, as a Jewish nation state, runs into additional criticism. It is seen, at best, as an anachronism, and, more often, as a force destabilising the surrounding region.

Today’s degraded form of anti-capitalism allows its adherents to lapse into anti-Semitism

So Jews have become the victims of today’s degraded form of radicalism. They are seen by many of today’s self-identified radicals as part of a conspiracy to control the world, with international bankers playing a particularly prominent role. They are alleged to be at the pinnacle of a hierarchy of privilege, with the bulk of the world’s population suffering beneath them. And they are attacked for supporting a uniquely malevolent nation state in a world in which nations are increasingly seen as problematic.

Anti-Semitism in the Labour Party goes way beyond a few errant individual matters. Today’s degraded form of anti-capitalism pre-disposes its adherents to a conspiratorial worldview. From this starting point it is all too easy to lapse into anti-Semitism.

However, there is one important point on which the defenders of the Labour Party are right. Anti-Semitism should not be singled out as a purely Labour phenomenon. Self-proclaimed radicals outside the Labour Party, like those within it, often share a similar worldview. These can include leftists who do not support Labour, as well as some of those who define themselves as greens.

But perhaps the most striking parallels are with Islamism. Extreme forms of Islam may use a different idiom to that of Labour radicals – Islamists are religious rather than secular, after all. But there are significant overlaps in their worldviews. Both, for example, share a conspiratorial perspective on the world. Islamists, like many of today’s radicals, also tend to focus on what they see as the pernicious power of international finance. That is why the World Trade Center in New York was targeted by al-Qaeda in 2001 – because it symbolised international finance. Nor should it be forgotten that Usman Khan, the London Bridge terrorist, was previously convicted of a plan to bomb the London Stock Exchange.

The visceral hatred against Israel from Islamist radicals is clear. For them, the existence of the Jewish State is an affront to Islam. Less well understood is the hostility of many Islamists to the nation state in general. Their ultimate goal is the creation of a worldwide caliphate that will replace nation states. In their transnationalism, at least, Islamist radicals share an important element in common with many contemporary leftists.

Anti-Semitism is a complex form of discrimination which can, in principle, exist in different sections of society. However, a terrible paradox of contemporary society is that those who consider themselves the most radical are often most prone to anti-Semitism. It is a tragedy that the radicalism of fools is gaining ground.

Daniel Ben-Ami is a writer. An expanded version of Ferraris for All: In Defence of Economic Progress is available in paperback. (Buy this book from Amazon (UK).)

Picture by: Getty.

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Comments

ZENOBIA PALMYRA

10th January 2020 at 9:36 pm

I didn’t read the article but I bet it’s really good.

Roslyn Ross

16th December 2019 at 12:22 am

The issue of anti-semitism will never be accurately addressed until Jews of conscience and Judaism the religion, separate themselves entirely from the Zionist State of Israel.

There is very little anti-semitism in the UK or the world in general. However, there is increasing and justified criticism of Israel as an apartheid state maintaining the most vicious military occupation in modern history by any nation claiming to be a democracy and possibly by any nation fullstop.

Israel should be condemned utterly for its relegation of non-Jewish citizens to second-class status; for its continued occupation of Palestine; for its denial of human and civil rights to around 6 million Palestinians simply because they are not Jews, but Christians and Muslims, and for its total travesty of civilized principles of rule of law, justice, human rights, democracy and common human decency.

No criticism of Israel is anti-semitic because Israel does not represent Jews or Judaism but instead gives both a bad name. At the point where Israel does what every other coloniser has done, gives full and equal rights to the indigenous people of the land it has stolen, provides an apology and compensation for the wrongs of its foundation, and creates a democracy where colonised and coloniser alike are equal, then Israel will be judged by a different bar and condemnation will end and no doubt, any visceral hatred which might have existed, will stop.

Michael Lynch

8th January 2020 at 8:44 pm

You obviously work for the Ayatollah.

Cedar Grove

17th January 2020 at 10:46 am

If it is racist to define Israel as a Jewish state, why do the various countries in the region with the words “Arab” & “Islamic” in their names not attract equal vilification from you?

Pakistan was created to be a specifically Muslim state in the same year the UN approved the creation of modern Israel as a Jewish homeland. Are you clamouring for its dissolution on the basis of what it’s done to indigenous Buddhists, Hindus and Christians?

The reason Arab countries are not building walls to defend themselves from Jewish, Yezidi, Zoroastrian and Christian rebels is that they have already murdered or driven out their minority populations.

Israel is the only Middle Eastern country in which the Christian population is not being persecuted. Its Arab, mostly Muslim, population is heading for 25% of the total. It is the only Middle Eastern country which doesn’t define homosexuality as a legal, often capital, offence.

Jordan was invented by the colonial powers as a new state for the Arabs of the region. Jews are not allowed to even have property there. The Arabs of what became Israel who did not wish to stay there when Ottoman domination was replaced by Jewish rule, were given full citizenship in Jordan.

Your diatribe completely ignores history and context, in order to point your finger exclusively at Israeli misdeeds. And that is antisemitism.

Steve Huckle

15th December 2019 at 5:28 pm

I find this article deeply disturbing – its correct title should be: “The one-sided view I choose”.

It is obvious Labour and the left has an issue with conflating anti-Israeli rhetoric with anti-Semitism. However, the right is hardly free of criticism. There are numerous recent examples – the dog-whistle racism of Farage’s “Breaking Point” poster and Johnson’s “letterbox” comment regarding hijab-wearing women, to name but two; indeed, I could go on and on and on.

Frankly – I do not accept “there is no alternative” – the market failure that is climate change dictates that has to be wrong. Otherwise, we’re all doomed.

However, I have to admit that, for now, Neoliberal free-market thinking has won the day. But if I must embrace Neoliberalism, can we please have some introspection on the right? If there is any hope whatsoever for a deeply divided British society, then racism in all its forms, and from wherever it comes, needs to be recognised and banished. And only with the banishment of overt racism can we begin to heal the divisions and come back together as a nation.

Jack Enright

15th December 2019 at 6:47 pm

“The market failure that is climate change”??
FYI, the climate has been changing ever since the planet had a climate – and all the signs are that it will continue to change, regardless of what we do!
As for the ludicrous claims that “97% of scientists agree yadda, yadda, yadda . . .”
Consensus is for politics; science doesn’t give a damn about opinion polls; it only takes notice of evidence. When Galileo said that the Earth orbited the Sun, ALL informed opinion of that day said he was wrong. Science proved that Galileo was right, and that the ‘consensus’ was wrong.
Further, if you read up about the supposed research which came up with that figure of 97%, it’s a joke. A couple of Warmists sent out a survey to all the people who – in their view – counted as ‘climate scientists’ (though they said that deciding whose name should be on the list was purely down to their own opinions). About 16% of those contacted replied, and it was 97% of those people who agreed that climate change was purely down to mankind.
So, the support for that view amounted to 97% of 16% of a completely unknown percentage of the world’s scientists. Not exactly crushing, is it?
If you (like me) are old enough to remember when Al Gore and Jim Hansen made their presentation to the US Congress, you will remember the claimns they made as to what would happen, and within only a few years, unless we took IMMEDIATE action to drastically cut CO2 emissions.
The Arctic Ocean becoming ice free, polar bears wiped out, southern Europe having a climate like the Sahara Desert, forcing hundreds of millions to flee north, low lying land drowned by sea levels rising 20 feet – and England having a Mediterranean climate!
30 years later, man-made CO2 emissions are still, rising relentlessly – with China and India between them opening three new coal-fired power stations a WEEK (funny how the Warmists never mention that?) – yet what have we seen?
The Arctic Ocean still covered in ice; polar bears numbers steadily increasing; southern Europe still being fertile land, not searing desert; the Netherlands, East Anglia and Romney Marsh just as they were 30 years ago; and as for England having a ‘Mediterranean climate’ – there’s NO sign of that in Derbyshire!

Jack Enright

15th December 2019 at 3:24 pm

“Supporters of the socialism of fools saw capitalism not as a flawed social system, but as a giant conspiracy manipulated by all-powerful Jews. In this nightmare vision, the world was controlled by an unholy alliance of international Jewish bankers and Jewish leftists.”
That attitude actually strikes me as being downright medieval. Earlier incarnations of fascism, such as the Knights Templars and the Jesuits who played a key role in the Spanish Inquisition, saw themselves as under continual threat from the forces of evil and from anyone who dared to breathe a word of criticism against the political establishment of the Church, or against their extremist interpretation of Christianity.
Their ‘modern’ counterparts demonise banks and businesses, and Jews rather than Cathars – but their certainty that they are the guardians of humanity, and their paranoid behaviour, is just the same. And just as dangerous as it was before.

Jonathan Yonge

15th December 2019 at 2:27 pm

Surely its simples.
Palestine owns all the grievance. Israel has none (apart from being a tiny democracy surrounded by jihadist millions).
So the revoltionaries thrive best with the Palestinian cause

This is very bad news for Palestine, because the left have occupied the role of ‘supporter’ but have no intention of doing anything effective apart from youtube clips. Indeed, the sane Palestinian is faced with the manipulation and corruption of their cause by shallow activists. Pity them.

Cedar Grove

17th January 2020 at 10:49 am

And the Palestinians have been terribly let down by their leaders, who seek to trap them in mediaeval habits of mind.

Gee Jaybee

15th December 2019 at 2:07 pm

Bear in mind some of the most disgusting anti Semitic remarks by Labour members went and still goes unpunished while this week’s first on Brendan O’Neill’s podcast was thrown out immediately for insisting that someone with a penis is not a woman.

Marvin Jones

12th December 2019 at 2:09 pm

The anti-Semites have certainly under the umbrella of Momento, found a solid comfortable and safe haven in the labour party. BUT! how have most of you people out there missed the big one. Is Britain on the whole anti-Semitic? I ask, because no matter how deep rooted and vast the problem is in the labour mob, why have they not suffered in the polls? why are they still a threat to the security of this country by still having a chance to govern, especially when looking at the lack of intellect in the shadow cabinet.

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steve moxon

11th December 2019 at 2:44 pm

No, the German leader’s socialism was a genuine faction of socialism: his beef was with the Bolsheviks, which he saw as a Semitic Russian expansionist version of socialism that failed to take account of national identity. This is the basis of the clash between him and the Soviet leader. Both were as socialist as each other: the Soviet leader’s ideological line was “socialism in one country”: the same as the German leadr’s. They both asserted the nation state as well as socialism, and both sought to build an empire.
The German leader indeed saw Semites as generally far too much to the fore, and his views here indeed were fervent to the extent of a pathology, but Semites were and are to the fore, not only financially but in all other areas. This is fact rather than prejudice. The problem is then how this is viewed. In Germany, anti-Semitism was an historically strong sentiment, presumably through longstanding perception of Semites being a powerful migrant enclave acting in their own interests against those of the country. ‘Identity politics’ totalitarians — the Left as it now is — by contrast see Jews as uber white men, and, therefore, beyond the pale. It’s this that is the basis of Leftist anti-Semitism today. [Some words changed because of stupid ‘moderation’]

Jack Enright

15th December 2019 at 3:34 pm

I strongly disagree with your assertion that “The German leader indeed saw Semites as generally far too much to the fore . . . ”
He needed a very visible target group to portray as ‘the enemy’ – so that he could portray himself as ‘the hero who will save the German people from their enemies’. A political tactic as old as the hills, and used to great effect by the Argentinian government in the run up to their invasion of the Falklands.
“You’re a decent person, so are the rest of your family, and so am I. So why is our great nation in such torment, my friend? It’s not YOUR fault, nor MY fault – it’s THEM!”
And, in 1930s Germany, what could be a more conveniently visible target to demonise than the Jews?

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Anthony Pearson

11th December 2019 at 1:50 pm

There are similarities between the antisemitism of the hard left clique within Labour and that of the Strasserites in 30’s Germany. This faction was worker based socialist with a main theoretical plank of anti-capitalism and a solution of considerable state ownership. Because of this, they even considered an alliance with the Soviet Union. They were not overly concerned with the religious/cultural aspects of Jewishness but were strongly antisemitic around the Jews and capital conspiracy. These ideas overlap with elements of the anti-capitalist Left and explain why they have no problem with a Jewish revolutionary, Trotsky, but are critical of Jewish entrepreneurs and a successful free enterprise nation, Israel.

Andy Gil

11th December 2019 at 11:17 am

An excellent analysis. The British left are deep in the swamp of anti-semitism, yet they believe themselves to be full of compassion and tolerance. They are the very definition of narcissistic hypocritcal scum, and very, very, morally sick.

Lloyd Reid

11th December 2019 at 10:24 am

A good article. I am remembered of something I heard previously. A country that loses its Jewish population inevitably goes into decline.

Ven Oods

12th December 2019 at 1:25 pm

“A country that loses its Jewish population inevitably goes into decline.”

If only someone had whispered that to the Pharaoh…

Cedar Grove

17th January 2020 at 10:54 am

And unfortunately for them, Jews serve as the canary in the coalmine for the rest of us. When we stand by and allow our Jewish neighbours to be discriminated against, we may be sure our own oppression is in the pipeline.

Jews can’t win.

If they’re internationalist, they’re blamed for transnational capitalism and Bolshevik totalitarianism.

If they’re Zionist, arguing that 0.18% of the Middle Eastern land mass should be set aside as a place where Jews can’t be persecuted for being Jewish, they’re racist oppressors.

Philip Davies

11th December 2019 at 10:23 am

Is there any connection between the strong mulim support for Labour and anti-semitism? Never seen this aspect discussed.

Michael Lynch

11th December 2019 at 11:43 am

If the media won’t discuss the grooming gang scandals then they certainly ain’t going to be making connections between Islam and Jew bashing. The British media are as infected by virtue signaling and political correctness as the establishment is. However, when it comes to the Jews they aren’t frightened to dig away at them. The whole thing is bizarre.

Puddy Cat

11th December 2019 at 10:14 am

This is just another example of us and them, you are either for us or against us and the rather odd reliance on backing the minority against the majority. In this election Labour has campaigned against the underprivileged by suggesting that they should not be second to some archetypal rich person but instead be subordinated to the state, paid to keep quiet and do as you are told against having the freedom to live without the state’s interference.

Being against the Israelis tips into a quasi-religious conflation which must be a green light to all forms of terrorism, Britain as sanctuary and their ultimate opposition to the USA.

Taken at its worst evocation, and baring in mind Mr Corbyn’s past view of the IRA, then he must be against the concept of Ulster (after the battle of the Boyne they must have considered calling the place ‘Result’, only demurred on the grounds of good taste to an anagram). A vote now for Mr Corbyn will no doubt lead directly to Ulster’s absorption in Eire.

The whole platform of naming your class enemies and seeking to eradicate them by some means or other leads to the proposition that there will be an arbiter of uncertain beliefs who in the future will continue to name these people, some people as enemies of the culture or even state depending on a rolling program of dislikes and caveats which could develop into a major statist weapon against anyone.

Dominic Straiton

11th December 2019 at 10:09 am

The Labour party is not interested in the Jewish vote because they are a proto Islamic party. And Islam along with the Koran is anti semitic. Its a hate fest that fits right in with the current left. There will only be one winner in the end and it wont be the left.

In Negative

11th December 2019 at 9:20 am

I reckon this was as strong a critique of this potential prejudice of the Left as you’ll get. Enjoyed it.

Ven Oods

11th December 2019 at 8:43 am

Interesting stuff.
I can’t profess to be worried about the reportedly low percentages of anti-Semitism among the greater British public. Whereas, the viewing figures for Bake-Off alongside the increasing prevalence of obesity makes me think we’re headed for hell in a handcart anyway.

brent mckeon

11th December 2019 at 6:18 am

Those damming Israel as an Apartheid state due to its ‘Jewish’ nature, what do they think of Muslim Pakistan brutally carved, Apartheid style, out of India with bloodshed and displacement that dwarfed the birth of Israel. Also what about Turkey using the army and force to carve out a Muslim majority Apartheid state in Cyprus?

T Zazoo

12th December 2019 at 7:54 pm

Yes I’ve always though the comparison to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan was interesting. A state for Muslims publicly declared by Jinnah. A place where the few remaining non-Muslims live a life far more precarious than any Palestinian.

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