Will we ever have an election again?

This has become farcical. This zombie parliament must end.

Tom Slater

Tom Slater
Deputy Editor

Share
Topics Brexit Politics UK

The year is 2051. An 87-year-old Boris Johnson is still prime minister, commanding a majority of minus 200 in the House of Commons.

The taxidermied remains of Jeremy Corbyn looks lairily at him each day from across the chamber.

The Liberal Independent Group for Anti-Democratic Change, formed by breakaway elements of the other parties in the great merger of 2020, is by far the largest bloc.

For some reason it has never found the ‘right time’ to assert control of the Commons. But by some convoluted means it has successfully delayed some 187 attempts to hold a General Election.

The UK is still a member of the European Union. But no one else is. Long since collapsed, it is now just a portacabin outside the Mini-Europe miniature park in Brussels.

It employs one man, whose job it is to sweep up, sort the post, and respond to the United Kingdom’s periodic requests for an extension to Article 50.

Somehow, his expenses are exorbitant.

They say making predictions these days is a mug’s game. But I’m pretty sure that’s where we’re headed. Or rather, given the Kafkaesque turn British politics has taken, nothing could surprise me now.

PM Boris Johnson has offered the opposition the election they claim to have been craving, again, and they appear set to reject it, again.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has indicated he will back a General Election once the European Union grants an extension to Article 50. But the EU is holding off on making that decision until MPs vote on the election.

You can see the problem here. But at least it will keep half of Corbyn’s parliamentary party happy, who are apparently dead-set against an election and would rather we go for a second Brexit referendum first.

Last night it was reported that Labour MPs have been instructed to abstain on Boris Johnson’s General Election motion, which will go before the Commons for a vote on Monday.

To call this behaviour dysfunctional just doesn’t cut it. It is depraved. This week, parliament once again blocked the government’s central legislation, but is refusing an opportunity to go to the country. There is no democratic justification for this.

Labour, the Lib Dems and the SNP are choosing to keep a man in power who they – in their more sassy moments – claim is basically Hitler because they think it suits their interests, either because they want him to sweat or (in Labour’s case) they fear the ballot box.

The upshot of all of this is that our immediate political impasse, and the deeper, more profound paralysis over Brexit, will go on – while people’s faith in democracy and the political class continues to drain away.

Three-and-half years since we voted to leave the EU, we are no closer to leaving, and no closer to any kind of resolution one way or another. These people want to overthrow our vote but still don’t have the balls – or the numbers – to do it decisively. At least not yet.

So what we have is endless, increasingly absurd, delay, perpetuated by a zombie parliament that, as Brendan O’Neill put it on spiked this week, is not so much out-of-touch as it is illegitimate. It has no mandate to lead and yet seemingly no desire to seek one.

How long can this go on? A long time, it seems – when you’ve got this shower in place. We at spiked never had that much faith in the political class. But the lack of principle and absence of shame on display at the moment is enough to surprise even the most hardened cynic.

Christ, we need an election.

It won’t in itself ‘settle’ Brexit. The Tories – the biggest, most viable Leave party – are after all offering us a ‘deal’ that falls far short of taking back control. And even then, the establishment is determined to fight that agreement tooth and nail.

But we need an election to bring us, the public, back into this process. And to give at least some members of the political class the shoeing they so clearly deserve.

We need to clear out those political fraudsters – the Anna Soubrys of this world – who have been squatting in parliament. Those who stood on pro-Brexit manifestos before defecting to other parties to thwart the wishes of their own constituents.

Seeing that lot lose their seats will be consolation enough for a Christmas election.

But more importantly, we need to remind the entire political class that we’re still here. That we haven’t gone away. That we know what is going on here.

This farce we’ve all been living through these past three years must come to an end. An election is the first essential step in that direction.

Tom Slater is deputy editor at spiked. Follow him on Twitter: @Tom_Slater_

Picture by: Getty

To enquire about republishing spiked’s content, a right to reply or to request a correction, please contact the managing editor, Viv Regan.

Comments

Jill W

27th October 2019 at 2:25 pm

Tom Slater’s media appearances alerted me to Spiked several years ago. MPs ‘who have been squatting in Parliament’ -made me smile.

A Ahmed

27th October 2019 at 12:04 pm

If they’re willing to do anything and everything to stop Brexit, they’ll be ready to rig an election.

Jim Lawrie

27th October 2019 at 9:33 am

To anyone who thinks your post far fetched, in 2015 the Scottish Parliament, citing the FTPA, extended its term from 4 to 5 years so as “not to coincide with the UK 2020 General Election.”
Apparently 2 elections in one year is more than us plebs can handle.

Jerry Owen

26th October 2019 at 9:52 am

I have a comment still under moderation after 18 hours .. is this a record ?

Peter Gardner

26th October 2019 at 5:43 am

It isn’t just the swamp dwellers of Westminster. Lady Spider and her colleagues did not mention the voting public once in their arguments supporting their judgment on Boris’s proroguing of parliament.
I wonder do people actually realise that there is nothing, absolutely nothing, to stop the swamp dwellers amending the Fixed Term Parliaments Act to increase the fixed term from five to seven or ten years, or to make it end only at the discretion of themselves – or perhaps on condition that the UK is still a member of the EU. Nothing. They could do this and not even have to stand down to avoid accounting for themselves to the electorate.
Bercow has, I am sure, mulled the precedent of the Long Parliament which sat from 1640 until 1660. By Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members.
This could be done by just one substantive and several small consequential changes to the FTPA. If I lay them out here perhaps some Remoaner will table an appropriate bill in parliament. Here goes.

Section 1 Polling days for parliamentary general elections
(3) The polling day for each subsequent parliamentary general election is to be the first Thursday in May in the fifthtwentieth calendar year following that in which the polling day for the previous parliamentary general election fell.
(4)But, if the polling day for the previous parliamentary general election—
(a)was appointed under section 2(7), and
(b)in the calendar year in which it fell, fell before the first Thursday in May, subsection (3) has effect as if for “fifth” there were substituted “fourth ” “nineteenth”.

That’s it. Job done, no election before June 2037.

If in bullish mood the swamp dwellers could go one better and rule that further elections may take place only with their consent. This would make for an even simpler Act, as follows:
Section 1 Polling days for parliamentary general elections
(1)This section applies for the purposes of the Timetable in rule 1 in Schedule 1 to the Representation of the People Act 1983 and is subject to section 2.
(2)The polling day for the next parliamentary general election after the passing of this Act is to be 7 May 2015.
Delete subsections (3) to (7) in their entirety

Section 2 Early pParliamentary general elections
(1)An early parliamentary general election is to take place if—
(a)the House of Commons passes a motion in the form set out in subsection (2), and
(b)if the motion is passed on a division, the number of members who vote in favour of the motion is a number equal to or greater than two thirds of the number of seats in the House (including vacant seats).
(2)The form of motion for the purposes of subsection (1)(a) is—
“That there shall be an early parliamentary general election.”

(3)An early parliamentary general election is also to take place if—
(a)the House of Commons passes a motion in the form set out in subsection (4), and
(b)the period of 14 days after the day on which that motion is passed ends without the House passing a motion in the form set out in subsection (5).
(4)The form of motion for the purposes of subsection (3)(a) is—
“That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty’s Government.”

(5)The form of motion for the purposes of subsection (3)(b) is—
“That this House has confidence in Her Majesty’s Government.”

(3)(6)Subsection (7)(4) applies for the purposes of the Timetable in rule 1 in Schedule 1 to the Representation of the People Act 1983.
(4)(7)If a parliamentary general election is to take place as provided for by subsection (1) or (3), the polling day for the election is to be the day appointed by Her Majesty by proclamation on the recommendation of the Prime Minister (and, accordingly, the appointed day replaces the day which would otherwise have been the polling day for the next election determined under section 1).

That’s it , the Long Parliament of 1640 re-established.

Jim Lawrie

26th October 2019 at 12:26 pm

Since their guiding principle is that The Law trumps Politics, in circumstances decided by them, there is no reason why they would look past the political machinery to what powers it – the electorate. Doing so would question the basis of their own power. They want to maintain the legal myth that they are beyond scrutiny and morally unimpeachable. They see themselves as a Council of Guardians, supervising the electorate and its wee pretendy Parliament. The Law is the vehicle, but not the guiding principle.

Barney Rubble

28th October 2019 at 3:12 pm

Peter Gardner says “I wonder do people actually realise that there is nothing, absolutely nothing, to stop the swamp dwellers amending the Fixed Term Parliaments Act to increase the fixed term from five to seven or ten years, or to make it end only at the discretion of themselves – or perhaps on condition that the UK is still a member of the EU. Nothing. They could do this and not even have to stand down to avoid accounting for themselves to the electorate.”

This is precisely the point that I am making to everyone who is demanding a GE. Why would the zombies put themselves at the mercy of an angry public? They won’t. They have arrogated supreme power to themselves and supreme power is NEVER surrendered. Never. They will do whatever they need to do to hang on to what they’ve got and they have already made it clear that there no lines they will not cross.

They know that we’re impotent to do anything about it.

P M

25th October 2019 at 11:25 pm

The Anti Brexit opposition causing political uncertainty can be BEATEN by a Monarch who should intervene to end their trickery. It might lead to another Cromwell rebellion or civil war led by Jeremy Corbyn or Ian Blackford BUT it will RESTORE a much needed ORDER in Parliament afterward.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 10:10 pm

Spiked
Please get your unbelievably poor moderation system sorted .

Coram Deo

25th October 2019 at 8:57 pm

IF YOU ONLY READ ONE THING ABOUT BORIS JOHNSON’S DEAL – MAKE IT THIS
Prime Minister’s deal is not a proper Brexit. I can only suppose that pro-Brexit MPs backing the deal have not actually read the Withdrawal Agreement (WA) and the important Political Declaration (PD) that goes with it. These make up a new European Treaty that reheats 95 per cent of Theresa May’s deal.
֎ Britain remains under EU rules but with no vote, no voice, no veto
֎ EU judges can still override our laws
֎ We won’t control our fishing
֎ We still won’t be free to trade as we see fit
֎ We won’t have control of our tax or state aid policies
֎ Britain can’t pursue an independent foreign policy
֎ Britain can’t pursue an independent defence policy
֎ The United Kingdom will be divided
֎ We pay the EU billions and get nothing in return
֎ And we’ll be trapped by the Political Declaration
Can any Brexiteer inclined to support this Treaty honestly say that it amounts to a proper Brexit? A Clean-Break Brexit remains the best deal for Britain. We need a General Election for a Leaver alliance to win a big majority and make Brexit a reality. Nigel Farage
https://mailchi.mp/thebrexitparty.org/if-you-only-read-one-thing-about-boris-johnsons-deal-make-it-this

Coram Deo

25th October 2019 at 8:54 pm

***BREXIT AND BRITISH VALUES
video – 7 minutes 18 seconds
A reminder to Boris Johnson and our dysfunctional political elite of the British values our proud Nation once held. Nicholas Szkiler
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHjqAto_qMA

Coram Deo

25th October 2019 at 8:54 pm

WHAT WILL IT MATTER IF WE HAVE A GENERAL ELECTION – IF GOOD MEN DO NOT STAND!

GOV.UK: LETTER FROM THE COMMITTEE ON STANDARDS IN PUBLIC LIFE TO PUBLIC OFFICE HOLDERS
includes video – 1 minute 36 seconds – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QX1AcgRURs
Accountability – Honesty – Integrity – Objectivity – Selflessness – Openness – & Leadership continue to convey the standards of behaviour expected by the public of those who serve them.
[It would almost be funny if it were not so tragic!
In what kind of men would we expect to find these 7 principals actively at work? Christian men! Adam, where art thou!]
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/841620/Scan_Nicola_Richardson_20191024-085013_1487_001.pdf

ZENOBIA PALMYRA

25th October 2019 at 8:29 pm

It’s incredible how one pointless referendum has succeeded in exposing the absurdity of the British ‘constitution’, almost destroying it completely. That’s what happens when you allow demagogues to rule.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 10:07 pm

Pointless and demagogue… Looking in the mirror again Z Palmyra ?

Richard Ings

25th October 2019 at 7:36 pm

As every protest movement has to start somewhere – is their enough anger / militancy yet to begin a nationwide mobilisation against Parliament?

My thought would be to ape what the Gilets Jaunes did in France and begin blocking roads until Parliament stops blocking Brexit/General Election. Taking the lead from Extinction Rebellion, this could be the Democracy Rebellion.

Two dates are significant, one of which has been mentioned: November 5th, and November 17th, which is the anniversary of the first ‘national day of blockage’ in France by the Gilets Jaunes. It might be a way of creating solidarity across borders in opposition to our respective governments/parliaments.

Gilets Jaunes began with a few disparate individuals on Facebook calling for a mobilisation, which then went viral. Within a few days, almost every roundabout in France had its ‘blockers’. Admittedly their cause was deliberately non-partisan (it was just about the cost of living) so less likely to stir up opposition from most members of the public.

I’m blue-sky thinking, but interested in what people might think about this. Is this a seed worth sowing? (In the event that the 31 October deadline passes and there’s still no vote for a GE. Even the threat of such a thing might focus minds in Westminster)

Andrew Leonard

28th October 2019 at 6:39 am

Perhaps the significant date is November 11. This will mark the 44th anniversary of Australia’s constitutional crisis (in which the senate was blocking supply bills). On that date in 1975, the crisis was brought to a head when the Governor-General dismissed the Labour PM from office, and commissioned a caretaker government, headed by the leader of the opposition (on the proviso that a GE be called ASAP).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_Australian_constitutional_crisis
A gut feeling tells me that the reign of QEII, is drawing to a dramatic climax.

James Knight

25th October 2019 at 4:49 pm

It is all about stopping a meaningful Brexit. That is more important to Starmer and Corbyn than winning an election. They criticise Johnson for not delivering on his promise after threatening to send him to prison if he did. That takes some gall.

Time to Drain the Swamp.

John Marks

25th October 2019 at 4:33 pm

The irony is that our supposedly useless monarch does have one important constitutional function.
Under §6(1) Fixed Term Parliaments Act, 2011, she retains the authority to dismiss a parliament by proclamation. This would usually be if a government couldn’t govern, usually from want of a majority and no other parties could agree to form a majority.
Well, there’s never been a better case, nor a more pressing case, than with this zombi parliament.
Your Majesty, what are you waiting for?

Dominic Straiton

25th October 2019 at 4:38 pm

She has shown herself to be utterly hopeless. George VI would have sorted this out three years ago.

Peter Gardner

26th October 2019 at 5:52 am

I wish, I wish it were true. Unfortunately Lady Spider and her colleagues stand ready to make up whatever law is required to render prorogation illegal.

Winston Stanley

25th October 2019 at 2:31 pm

LOL The rogue parliament seriously needs to get its act together.

> Violence against MPs is a ‘price worth paying’ to get their way on Brexit say majority of both Leavers and Remainers in ‘genuinely shocking’ survey

Majority thought violence to MPs or injury to the public ‘a price worth paying’
Professor Richard Wyn Jones, of Cardiff University, said he was ‘shaken’
Cabinet Office minister Oliver Dowden urged violence was unacceptable
Universities of Cardiff and Edinburgh used YouGov data to reach findings

Violence against MPs is a ‘price worth paying’ to get the Brexit result they want, say a majority of both Leavers and Remainers in a ‘genuinely shocking’ survey.
The study, based on polling by YouGov, found 71% of Leavers in England, 60% in Scotland and 70% in Wales believed violence towards MPs was a ‘price worth paying’ for Brexit.
Among Remainers, 58% in England, 53% in Scotland and 56% in Wales considered violence towards MPs was a ‘price worth paying’ for Britain to stay in the EU.
The survey’s co-director Professor Richard Wyn Jones said he was ‘genuinely shocked’ at the findings carried out by researchers from Cardiff University and the University of Edinburgh. – Daily Mail

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 3:26 pm

If UK citizens are thinking along those lines, imagine what certain foreign powers are thinking, when they observe the pathetic state the nation is in

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 3:36 pm

Interesting post from Winston !
Having once believed in ‘revolution / seizing power’ of the socialist variety I have over many years come to the conclusion that consensus is preferable, probably one of the reasons I have such a loathing of the XR types . The world is littered with the corpses of millions murdered by those that think they know better than others. People like our arrogant politicians and MSM that think they can sh*t on me and 17.4 million people without any negative comeback whatsoever.
Hitchens wrote an astute piece about the Canning tube incident and that the ‘mob’ ( not meant as an insult .. just Hitchens usual abrasiveness ) is never that far away. The last ‘mob’ action I can remember was the Poll tax riots which in fact was victorious by the use of numbers / force. The 84/85 miners strike was narrowly beaten but it was touch and go.
Brexit is a colossus in comparison with those two, anger is high, mine is off the richter scale !
I would prefer a democratic solution to Brexit but find myself increasingly of the opinion that a democratic solution is not possible, especially when you have Verhofstadt openly admit the the EU is an Empire in the making. If I were a participant in that poll I rather reluctantly would now find myself on the side of those that favour some form of non democratic action.
We have had treason committed against us and I know why the MSM and indeed Spiked never refer to that word because the punishment for treason is in fact the worst punishment possible.
If things kick off I will be there.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 10:05 pm

I responded to your post hours ago in some detail …still under moderation yet a dozen by others published since … Not good enough from spiked !

Willie Penwright

25th October 2019 at 1:44 pm

We are now getting down to the wire. Jeremy Corbyn has conceded a general election so long as there will be tea amd biscuits. If the Government grants the biscuits he will demand chocolate biscuits.

Barney Rubble

25th October 2019 at 1:40 pm

All well and good but the problem is that we are powerless. We can’t force an election. Even the government can’t force one. All they can do is nag plaintively. The Zombie parliament is terrified of having to face the public so, the longer this goes on, the more likely they are to frustrate, obfuscate in order to hang on to the power they have now engineered for themselves.

So, when it comes round to 2022 expect another hastily drafted Bill to suspend the election because…..reasons. And it will pass.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 3:39 pm

Barney Rubble
Never think you are powerless, there is always a way forward, some more preferable than others !

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 1:17 pm

Boris could introduce a Bill to repeal the Fixed Term Parliaments Act. If the Bill fails, or they hide a behind a Bercow veto, Labour/LibDem/SNP will have declared themselves Members for life.

They will then have to be removed by a show of force. We’re heading for a similar situation to The Poll Tax riot, only this time the anger is not about 3 or 4 million being excluded from the vote, it is about 17.4m. I’ll be there. Get yourselves into good shape ladies and gentlemen.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 3:38 pm

I’m polishing my boots up ready !

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 10:10 pm

Sharpen yir steelies.

Jam Butties

25th October 2019 at 4:59 pm

Exactly Jim. Repeal the FTPA and away we go. Only question is why do the Tories not do this? I think you may well know the answer.

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 6:22 pm

No. I don’t know the answer, and would be glad of your thoughts.

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 6:33 pm

SNP think the longer this goes on, the more support for them will grow. That they just have to wait till the time is right. I think the recent increase in support is like that for LibDEm when they decided to trash the Referendum result. When the rush of blood subsides, so too does the support, as people return to thinking with their heads instead of their hearts.

Jane 70

25th October 2019 at 12:36 pm

https://order-order.com/

Evidence of why Labour are holding out : Abbott ‘cancels’ the very excellent, honest and steadfast Kate Hoey.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 11:36 am

Probably one of Tom’s best articles .. sadly truer than he semi- jests !
Listening to three Muppets in Westminster avoiding the question of an GE was infuriating. They made it clear that once ‘ they ‘ had got what they wanted we could have one .
There you have it British democracy is dead .. no argument about it now .
On a busy flyover this morning I saw a large electronic billboard saying ‘ Let’s put the exit back in Brexit ‘ .
Remember it’s the 5th of November soon , I seem to remember historically it is a favourable date !

Perverted Lesbian

25th October 2019 at 10:18 am

Welcome to purgatory everyone.

Serious question, what can the electorate do about this, or has this debacle inadvertently demonstrated that we the people have no power at all and the pretence that we ever did has now been shattered? The contract that worked for so many years, where ‘we the people give you power on the understanding that every now and then you allow us to make a decision’ has that contract now been broken forever? Are we even prepared for that? I doubt it, I’m sure Britain will revert to the default state of apathy pretty quickly. That is the real shame, as annoying as this whole process has been, the British are just not that radical. The status quo will most likely win out. I would love to be proved wrong.

Michael Lynch

25th October 2019 at 10:14 am

It’s looking more like a Remain dictatorship day by day. Right up Soubry’s street. This is exactly what Boris wants in a way. He knows the longer it goes on the temperature of the electorate rises. The British Public are furious. They say Labour can’t win with Corbyn, but I doubt they could win with anyone. They know it and that’s why they are using Brexit to keep running away from the judgement.

Amelia Cantor

25th October 2019 at 9:57 am

Votes are only acceptable when there is a progressive outcome. Fortunately, even a vote with an unacceptable outcome (like Brexit) can be discarded in our current system, thanks to that heart-warming alliance of BAME communities, lawyers, sociology lecturers, woke students, et al. Nevertheless, it would have been better if the Brexit referendum had never taken place.

BTW, can we please have a hard-hitting essay from one or another of the Comrades about the deaths of 39 Chinese migrants in Essex? The essay should use the tragedy to argue for Open Borders, but not examine the question of how Open Borders will create a permanent progressive majority even faster than is currently the case. Chinese folk know how to run a democracy in the right way, and the more of them there are in the UK the quicker the last cis white male toxins will be flushed out of our political system.

P.P.S. Pakistani folk are even better for British democracy than Chinese folk, of course, but it wasn’t Pakistanis who died in Essex.

P.P.P.S. But whatever: I’d like a Comradely essay arguing for “Open Borders now!” Then we’ll really be able to put Brexit and Brexitards where these toxic phenomenon and folk belong.

Baked Beans

25th October 2019 at 10:11 am

” . . it would have been better if the Brexit referendum had never taken place”
Oh really?
How so?

Amelia Cantor

25th October 2019 at 10:16 am

Because then intelligent, educated, ethical folk like me wouldn’t have had to clean up the mess caused by stupid, uneducated racists like you.

As I said: “Votes are only acceptable when there is a progressive outcome.” Therefore the ideal is that votes should never be held when a progressive outcome is in doubt.

Hugh Bryant

25th October 2019 at 2:05 pm

Can you not see that Amelia Cantor is a spoof account? Jeez.

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 2:44 pm

Hugh, she seems fairly typical of someone indoctrinated in the anti-white ideology and its associated moral supremacism, that Western universities are now producing en masse.

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 10:30 am

Her diatribes are steadily improving, although I still prefer Titania.
What about you guys?

Amelia Cantor

25th October 2019 at 10:33 am

Titania punches down. That’s why she gets slobbered over in Murdoch papers and re-tweeted by neo-nazis.

I punch up. That’s why rightards like you try to pretend I’m not genuine.

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 10:53 am

How do you punch up when everyone outside the Woke Community is beneath you?

That’s why rightards like you try to pretend I’m not genuine.

You’ve misinterpreted. Comparing what you say to TM is not meant to imply I don’t think you’re genuine in you’re struggle for cosmic justice. On the contrary, I’m of the opinion you mean every word of it.

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 11:30 am

Leonard
I don’t even read her ramblings

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 11:38 am

“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

Sun Tzu, The Art of War

Perverted Lesbian

25th October 2019 at 12:41 pm

Your overuse of the word ‘Folks’ gives you away. White, male, 40+
Nevermind, perhaps work on it and come back to us with a new name, remember, knowing your audience and discipline is key to staying character.

Amelia Cantor

26th October 2019 at 9:44 am

How do you punch up when everyone outside the Woke Community is beneath you?

Now you need lessons in elementary logic and the parsing of simple English. But you’re a rightard, so that’s to be expected.

I am certainly above racists like you in terms of issues around ethics, knowledge, education, and so on. But in terms of white privilege, heteronormativity, patriarchy, fiscal power, etc, I am below you.

Therefore when I criticize you and other toxic cis white males, I am punching UP.

But Titania, who is in fact a toxic cis white male and works on behalf of other toxic cis white males, is punching DOWN.

I hope that explanation has helped a little and that the habitual mental fog that occupies your cranium has lifted for a moment or two.

Andrew Leonard

26th October 2019 at 11:06 am

All this above you / below you talk is very revealing.
It betrays a need to rationalise away personal failings, by imagining some vast social force that holds you down, but all the while remaining hopeful of salvation, when similarly oppressed groups manage to take control of society, through sheer weight of numbers.

Its psychology driving you, and psychology alone. There must some recalcitrant part of your brain that realises the foreign cultures you support are more, and in some cases vastly more, racist, ‘heteronormative’, and patriarchal, than the one you’re living in.

This is why you and the Woke community are so keen to censor, deplatform, shout down, and smear, anyone who contradicts your fantasy worldview. It has nothing to do with being more virtuous. It has everything to do with the psychological torture of real world truths, spoken against your ideological security blanket, resulting in unbearable cognitive dissonance.

I hope you don’t mind being psychoanalysed in public, and the feeling of nakedness that comes with it, but a moment or two of self-awareness could begin your journey to a better life.

Mike Ellwood

25th October 2019 at 12:31 pm

Cantor by name; cant by nature.

Noggin The nog

25th October 2019 at 3:56 pm

Cantor is most likely a SJW troll. Perhaps even supported by the BBC. It is best to ignore the writer.

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 1:41 pm

Thanks Amelia.
Might I suggest to you the great British tradition of downing a dozen drinks and going out on the pull on a Friday night.

Andrew Leonard

25th October 2019 at 9:52 am

More than 32 years? It won’t take that long, Tom.
The situation will be resolved in few years time, when the EU army occupies the UK. What about British Armed Forces, you say? You mean, the ones controlled by Her Majesty’s Government?

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 12:33 pm

There is a widespread ant-Tory/anti-English sentiment up here that says if we can influence the timing of a UK GE to most disadvantage Boris, that is the way to go.
The SNP want IndyRef2 before a General Election, but cannot secure it without voting for a General Election.

There is absolutely zero respect among the SNP and its supporters for democracy. They take the view that the end justifies the means.

Jane 70

25th October 2019 at 12:41 pm

And they’ve effectively silenced those of us up here who reject their manoeuvres and policies.

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 5:45 pm

In attempts to discuss the principles of what is happening, I am met with the erudite “Aye Jim. But what you don’t understand is that these are special circumstances, ‘n they rules don’t apply right now.”
When I ask what principles and rules do apply the answer is “It’s no a matter a’ principles right noo, it’s case a’ gittin rid a’ The Tories.”

It is frightening to think that The SNP might be propelled to power on that basis.

Under the euphemism of attacking Orangeism and Loyalism, the white working class are being toxified to the point of untermenschen. It is a dangerous game to play. Thinking they their day has come, and that they occupy the moral high ground through vicarious victimhood, sections of the Irish Catholic community, criminal elements included, are joining in, not realising that they are just lackeys. Catholics from Eastern Europe are willing participants, and look down readily on the local working class.

Jim Lawrie

25th October 2019 at 6:52 pm

Jane 70 the displays of unctuousness by so many up here as they bow, scrape and bend to show their eagerness to repeat every SNP utterance and comply with its commands is jaw dropping.

a watson

26th October 2019 at 9:04 am

Anti-English sentiment becoming widespread down here for similar reasons. The contempt for democracy has been apparent in London for a considerable time.

Jim Lawrie

26th October 2019 at 2:40 pm

A Watson they are deepening divisions and heightening racial tension. Hostility to immigrants who choose to organise along racial lines and ally themselves with our enemies is not racism. It is self defence.

ZENOBIA PALMYRA

25th October 2019 at 8:30 pm

‘EU army occupies the UK’ — Is there no end to Brexiteer hysteria? Searching hysterically for enemies everywhere.

Andrew Leonard

26th October 2019 at 12:26 am

You’re right – Remain is far to principled to allow anything like that to occur. LOL

Jane 70

25th October 2019 at 9:12 am

“You have been sat to long here for any good you have been doing. Depart, I say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go!.”

.”look on the people you represent, and break not your trust, and expose not the honest party of your kingdom, who have bled for you, and suffer not misery to fall upon them for want of courage and resolution in you, else the honest people may take such courses as nature dictates to them.”

A couple of apposite and timely Cromwell quotes.

We are now ostensibly governed by the parliamentary equivalent of The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party.

Time to get rid!

Kathryn Barbara

25th October 2019 at 9:10 am

Hello, hello Tom. I like your descriptions of elements in Parliament as “squatters” and “political fraudsters”, they are certainly that.
The political impasse is real, and yes voters are being left out of this process, but at the very worst we do get to vote in 2022 according to the fixed term act. Clearly the election is needed sooner though.
Like many Leavers I’ve been waiting for the revoke article 50 moment. They are biding their time. Why go nuclear when continual extensions will do the job?

Jerry Owen

25th October 2019 at 11:39 am

Cameron brought in the fixed term act. It can be abolished. The Supreme Court will make short shrift of that one. In fact I’m surprised King Bercow isn’t on the case already.

Kathryn Barbara

25th October 2019 at 12:38 pm

Yes he did, to protect the coalition. When I tackled my MP on this he was fuming about it, and agreed that it should go. I also think the convention of not putting candidates up against the speaker in his constituency deprives voters of chances to vote. It’s no surprise his election has twice the average number of spoilt ballots. As for the “switchers” who don’t offer by-elections…

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to comment. Log in or Register now.