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Friday 1 March 2013 March 2013
Patrick Hayes
‘You need some obsession in life, or you’re dead’
Neil Young is considered the archetypal hippy, but his new autobiography reveals him to be an off-message car-loving fan of capitalism.

Luke Gittos
The greatest legal philosopher of our time
Ronald Dworkin, who died last week, brilliantly argued for the injection of moral beliefs into the black-and-white world of The Law.

Rob Lyons
Are one-in-five Britons really living in poverty?
A new book casts a sceptical eye at today’s poverty claims, and offers some thoughts on how people might be made wealthier.

Wendy Earle
Museums are not playgrounds for pet political projects
The movement to make museums the focus for work around social justice and human rights can only undermine their main purpose: the curation and display of objects.

Alexander Adams
The cult that wants to be a religion
From its sacred text to its absurd creation myth, Scientology is far closer to recognised religions than its critics allow. Just with a therapeutic twist.

Tim Black
'The world itself is a bad dream'
On the fiftieth anniversary of its publication, the cool cynicism and snobbery of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar has gone mainstream.

Zac Alstin
‘Anything is magnificent
compared with nothing’

We could learn a lot from Chesterton’s thoughtful war on the eugenic elitism and lazy atheism that reduced everything, even humans, to mere matter.

Sean Collins
Scourge of the elites
Christopher Lasch was a fearless iconoclast who defied left and right labels. Love him or loathe him, you need to grapple with his ideas if you want to understand today’s big political and moral debates.

Monday 4 March 2013
Andrew Calcutt
Berlusconi and Beppe: separated at birth?
Politician-comedian and so-called man of the people Beppe Grillo is really just the anti-political son of Silvio.

Dominic Standish
Italy: why the EU is panicked by populism
EU officials’ fear of ‘populism’, such as that expressed in the Italian election, is really a fear of the populace.

Frank Furedi
So, when is sex appropriate?
ESSAY: The current moral crusade against ‘inappropriate behaviour’ speaks to today's stultifying and prurient political culture.

Tuesday 5 March 2013
Joanna Williams
There is no right to be a postgraduate
Turning postgrad studies into a 'human right' empties them of the testing and rigour that make them special.

Barbara Hewson
Why shouldn’t EDF protect its gas plants?
That greens think they have a right to protest anywhere shows how megalomaniacal they have become.

Nathalie Rothschild
Why we should chill out about ‘illegals’
Nathalie Rothschild reports from Sweden on how politicians, the police and the EU have ganged up against the non-problem of illegal immigrants.

Wednesday 6 March 2013
Rob Lyons
The immorality
of ‘sin taxes’

In a speech in Westminster, Rob Lyons called on the state to butt out of the public’s eating, boozing and smoking habits.

Stuart Derbyshire
The miracle of
the HIV-free baby

The apparent curing of a baby with HIV is a brilliant reminder of man’s capacity to defeat nature’s many menaces.

Mick Hume
Nobody wins election
that never was!

After the Eastleigh by-election, the question is not just who might win the next British General Election, but what is politics for anymore?

Thursday 7 March 2013
Denis Joe
Don’t let abuse fears ruin music
A Savile-style inquiry into one of the UK’s top music schools could wreck the informality essential to music tuition.

Rob Lyons
Another day, another
overblown food scare

The claim that eating processed meat will kill you is built on shoddy evidence and more than a dash of snobbery.

Brendan O’Neill
Chavez’s cheerleaders: parasites on US impotence
Far from doing battle with US imperial hegemony, Hugo Chavez and his Western fans merely danced on the grave of America’s withered global clout.

Friday 8 March 2013
Tom Slater
A nostalgic trip to the road movie era
So Yong Kim’s For Ellen pays homage to 1970s American cinema but fails to capture its terse emotionality.

David Bowden
Scandi-noir: the saviour of British TV?
That both the BBC and ITV now risk slow-moving detective dramas confirms the massive impact of The Killing.

Duleep Allirajah
Football fans, let’s burst this authoritarian ‘bubble’
Why is there so little liberal outrage over the ‘bubbling’ of fans by police, when it assaults both justice and freedom of movement?

Monday 11 March 2013
Luke Gittos
It's time to be open about ‘open justice’
The Justice and Security Bill has caused a furore, but there are already too many legal rulings made behind closed doors.

Barbara Hewson
Let’s rip up the Human Rights Act
This act that treats humans as fragile creatures who lack autonomy should be dumped in the dustbin of bad ideas.

Josie Appleton
An unspoken war on the Common Law
ESSAY England’s rights-respecting Common Law is being shunted aside by new forms of arbitrary, inquisitorial power. It’s time for a fightback.

Tuesday 12 March 2013
James Woudhuysen
3D printing: neither gimmick nor revolution
ESSAY: While additive manufacturing will be a very useful technology, it cannot transform the fortunes of capitalism.

Vidhi Doshi
Kenya’s mighty snub to the West
By electing Uhuru Kenyatta as president, Kenyans showed they are not willing to have their future decided by outsiders.

Patrick Hayes
Keeping tribes in cultural formaldehyde
India’s Supreme Court is right to reject a Western-led bid to keep the Jarawa people isolated from everybody else.

Tim Black
Huhne v Pryce: the politics of dirty linen
This sordid affair exposes how insular, self-important and allergic to the ideal of privacy the modern political class is.

Wednesday 13 March 2013
Rob Lyons
‘Yes, some food is better than other food’
Rob Lyons answers readers’ questions on Jamie Oliver, food snobbery, and his very own tuna pasta surprise.

Christopher Snowdon
How Eurocrats created their own fan club
In an extract from his new book, Christopher Snowdon exposes the EU leaders who pay NGOs to support them.

Brendan O’Neill
The SWP: slain by cynical scandal-milkers
The socialists have joined the Catholic Church and the BBC as victims of a corrosive zeitgeist that views all institutions as nests of perverts.

Thursday 14 March 2013
Tom Bailey
‘Zionist’: the worst
insult in the world

Among the Western chattering classes, ‘the Zionist’ has replaced 'the Jew' as the cause of the world's ills.

Robin Walsh
It's the antibiotics
apocalypse! Again...

Ignore the Chief Medical Officer’s fearmongering: antibiotic resistance can be tackled with new antibiotics.

Mick Hume
Stitching up press freedom behind closed doors
Labour and Hacked Off are now prepared to hold the political system to ransom and rewrite the UK constitution in order to tame the press.

Friday 15 March 2013
Tom Slater
Stoker: an almost accidental work of genius
Oldboy director Chan-wook Park’s English-language debut turns a derivative script into a striking movie.

Duleep Allirajah
It’s official: Aussie sport has gone soft
The once all-conquering Aussie cricket team has dropped four players for not handing in their homework. WTF?

David Bowden
TV, try telling me something I don’t know
Dan Snow’s flawed A History of Syria was still a rare bright spot in a week of superficial factual television.

Tim Black
From class politics to classy products
Once, people defined themselves by what they did and believed; now, as Harry Wallop’s entertaining Consumed reveals, we are what we buy.

Monday 18 March 2013
Patrick West
Does all pop sound the same to you?
If you’re over 30 and think pop music is bland or overly sexual, then face it: you have finally become your dad.

Patrick Marmion
The Audience: QEII as global brand
Peter Morgan’s new play continues his genuflection to the monarch at the expense of the leaders we have elected.

Frank Furedi
Porn: no longer a dirty little secret
The normalisation of porn-use in the 21st-century West speaks to a serious crisis of values – one that censorship won't solve.

Tuesday 19 March 2013
Dennis Hayes
Teaching students
to think racially

Race theory is dividing university students, with whites depicted as racist, and blacks as permanently oppressed.

Alka Sehgal Cuthbert
Stop screwing around with the curriculum
Instead of yet more sex education, young people need the freedom to explore and develop among themselves.

Brendan O’Neill
Don’t blame Hacked Off for this crisis of liberty
Screeching at Hugh Grant is a displacement activity for intellectuals who can’t explain or reverse the historic corrosion of press freedom.

Wednesday 20 March 2013
Rob Lyons
Adopt a polar bear? Have you seen what they do?
How did the polar bear, a vicious killing machine that is thriving, become the poster boy of climate-change alarmism?

Para Mullan
Treating workers like unthinking primitives
The idea that workplaces should root out employees’ ‘unconsious biases’ is patronising and illiberal.

Mick Hume
10 random lies about the press freedom stitch-up
The shabby deal to impose a new press regulator by royal charter has sparked an outpouring of myths, misrepresentation and mendacity.

Thursday 21 March 2013
Kevin Rooney
Three cheers for the fans fighting back
How Scottish football fans are resisting the state's violent clampdown on their speech and behaviour.

Kevin Yuill
In defence of old people’s right to live
Those of us who see great worth in old people’s lives should oppose the demands for a ‘right to die’ for over-70s.

Tim Black
The teenage futility of bashing baby boomers
The pseudo-radical vogue for screeching at comfortably off pensioners will not improve the lives of the young. It will only divide society.

Friday 22 March 2013
Tom Slater
The reincarnation of Snoop Dogg
In a new documentary, the legendary rapper goes to Jamaica, embraces Rastafarianism and puts away his past. Or does he?

David Bowden
In the Flesh: the braindead, with brains
The zombie peace process in Northern Ireland seems to be the inspiration for a fine zombie comedy-drama.

Duleep Allirajah
England: still waiting for the Chosen One
The travails of would-be messiahs Michael Owen and Wayne Rooney raise awkward questions for English football.

Frank Furedi
‘If you question the Savile crusade, you're seen as evil’
Frank Furedi on his new book about Jimmy Savile, and why it's so hard, but so important, to challenge the moral crusade on child abuse.

Monday 25 March 2013
Rob Lyons
Have politicians had a mental blackout?
There’s a real risk of energy shortages in Britain, yet still the political class is obsessed with cutting fossil fuel use.

Alex Standish
We don’t need
no eco-propaganda

A geography expert explains why he’s pleased that schoolkids will be taught less about climate change.

Tim Black
Boris Berezovsky and the Evil Empire nostalgists
In the eyes of Westerners who crave some of those old Cold War certainties, every death of a Russian oligarch is proof of Putin’s malfeasance.

Tuesday 26 March 2013
Patrick Hayes
One off the wrist for health fanatics
A new fitness app - a data-generating wristband to be worn 24/7 - claims to help you to ‘live better’. Far from it.

Chrissie Daz
Trans: the phoniest community in Britain?
Note to transgender activists: getting together on the web to discuss your vulnerability does not make you a community.

Mick Hume
Accepting Leveson means accepting we have lost
The current nitpicking about the details of the shabby Royal Charter deal is not nearly enough to defend press freedom.

Wednesday 27 March 2013
Joel Cohen
How to lose supporters and alienate people
Student radicals slam universities for outsourcing jobs, yet they outsource their protests to the dinosaurial politics of the past.

Joe Jackson
Why should pop music have to be rebellious?
If you think pop and rock are a young man's game that oldies should steer clear off, you're just not a music fan.

Rob Lyons
This barking at politicians is getting boring
Eddie Mair’s humiliation of London mayor Boris Johnson was a triumph for anti-political cynicism, not journalism.

Bruno Waterfield
Treating Cyprus as the Eurozone’s lab rat
The Euro elites have bullied Cyprus into becoming an economic experiment, and to hell with what Cypriots want.

Brendan O’Neill
Eco-obedience: a lifetime of Lent with no pay-off
At least the gospels promise us the Kingdom of God - green self-denial gives us nothing.

Thursday 28 March 2013
Tim Black
From class politics to classy products
Once, people defined themselves by what they did and believed; now, as Harry Wallop’s entertaining Consumed reveals, we are what we buy.

James Woudhuysen
Big Pharma’s little critics
One defence of drug manufacturers, and three attacks on modern medicine, offer much. But none quite explains Big Pharma’s crisis of scientific and technological innovation.

Christopher Snowdon
How Eurocrats created their own fan club
In this extract from his new report, Euro Puppets, Christopher Snowdon exposes the EU leaders paying NGOs to support them.

Kevin Rooney
Lowering the flag on old-
fashioned Ulster loyalism

Working-class loyalists are the only constituency in Northern Ireland to have shunned the therapeutic ideas and language of the peace process - and they're being punished for it.

Para Mullan
The psychopathology of office politics
Oliver James' advice for workers on ‘how to thrive in a world of lying, backstabbing and dirty tricks’ merely reinforces the navel-gazing of today's atomised workforce.

Rob Lyons
Climate change:
an elite affectation

Rupert Darwall’s history of the idea of global warming shows how the belief in an impending manmade apocalypse emanated from the top of wealthy Western societies.

Frank Furedi
‘If you question the Savile crusade, you're seen as evil’
Frank Furedi on his new book about Jimmy Savile, and why it's so hard, but so important, to challenge the moral crusade on child abuse.

Josie Appleton
A twenty-first
century folk devil

In Moral Crusades in an Age of Mistrust, Frank Furedi adroitly uses the sociological literature around moral panics to draw out the deeper meaning of the Jimmy Savile scandal.


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