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Monday 3 September 2012 September 2012
James Woudhuysen
Big trouble in the East China Sea
A row between Japan, China and Taiwan over a few small islands reveals the arbitrariness of international relations.

Tiffany Jenkins
Let’s welcome Israeli dancers to Scotland
The childish Westerners calling for boycotts of Israeli artists are having a corrosive impact on creativity.

Sean Collins
Romney’s empty suit vs Obama’s empty chair
With the hope hoopla of the 2008 campaign a distant memory, now we have a contest between a letdown president and a vacuous challenger.

Tuesday 4 September 2012
Patrick Hayes
‘Fuck your
free speech’

A tiny EDL march in London would have been insignificant were it not for the OTT response of left-wing groups.

Tim Black
Stop trying to lance the Boyle
Frankie Boyle’s comedy of offence is a byproduct of our censorious ‘You Can't Say That!’ culture.

Brendan O’Neill
Turning the Paralympics
into a political tool

These Games are an inspiring showcase of human resilience, but that doesn’t mean we should feel a moral duty to get excited about them.

Wednesday 5 September 2012
Theresa Clifford
In defence of the freedom to troll
Just because an Oz celeb received a few nasty comments on Twitter, that is no reason to regulate free speech online.

Patrick Hayes
The Hague will always be a tool of the West
Desmond Tutu is wrong to believe that dragging Blair before the ICC will make that institution more democratic.

Tim Black
Reshuffling politics off this mortal coil
The ministerial merry-go-round has always left those outside the Westminster bubble cold, but now even politicians seem disillusioned.

Thursday 6 September 2012
Jason Walsh
Rioting for more cultural recognition
In Northern Ireland, where respect for cultural identity is King, communities that feel disrespected start riots.

Tom Bailey
Fizzing with authoritarian intent
Having long been battling drugs, it now seems the British state is about to launch the sequel: the War on Dr Pepper.

Mick Hume
Leveson: drawing up the battlelines
Mick Hume, author of a new book on press freedom, says questioning of the Leveson Inquiry is in danger of being too little, too late.

Friday 7 September 2012
Ed Noel
Bad Education fails to make the grade
Comedian Jack Whitehall’s new but wearily predictable school comedy fails to live up to his previous efforts.

Tom Slater
The magic of the movie soundtrack
Despite the fanboyishness of Berberian Sound Studio, the way it shows how sound can change our lives is enthralling.

Patrick West
Delusions of a
desert-island castaway

Desert Island Discs is the perfect opportunity for posturing, preening and pretending to have read Proust.

Duleep Allirajah
Let’s be honest about the Paralympics
It’s not the Olympics, but the Paralympics has some amazing sport – if only people could stop patronising the athletes.

Tim Black
The staggeringly pretentious footballer
The Secret Footballer reveals more about today’s elite loathing of football players and fans than it does the dark reality of the beautiful game.

Monday 10 September 2012
Tom Bailey
Young people drink
booze – get over it

The idea that sexy adverts for Martini or posh vodka are what encourage teens to drink is completely bonkers.

Barbara Hewson
Fancy having a judge in your living room?
Courts are treating competent adults as vulnerable beings who need state protection. That’s bad for liberty.

Wendy Kaminer
US politics: a punch-up between mythmakers
Partisanship is the lifeblood of politics, but in America we now have hyperpartisanship, where blind groupthink is trumping tough debate.

Tuesday 11 September 2012
Rob Lyons
These control freaks should just tuck off
The Tuckshop Taliban is peeved that its healthy-eating mania isn’t very influential in new academy schools. Good.

Josie Appleton
The unfree streets of London
A shocking new Google Map shows the bits of London where you can become a criminal without even realising it.

Tim Black
The immorality of compensation culture
Frank Furedi talks to spiked about his new report on how the compo frenzy is fuelling a climate of suspicion across the public sector.

Wednesday 12 September 2012
Patrick Hayes
The silence of the London 2012 killjoys
Protesters who planned to ruin London 2012 with jeering stunts and anti-Games rallies are now feeling very stupid indeed.

Brendan O’Neill
New Olympic sport: sneering at squaddies
The hostility shown towards some soldiers during the Games is a product of the elite’s disavowal of military values.

Mick Hume
An Olympic-shaped hole in our society?
Everybody now agrees that the London 2012 Games showed Britain can ‘do big things’. So why did nobody believe that two months ago?

Thursday 13 September 2012
Tim Black
Hillsborough report: a victory for truth?
The focus on ‘who did what’ back in April 1989 obscures the authorities' long-standing war on football fans.

Helen Searls
There’s more to politics than values
The Democrat convention was big on moral posturing about gay marriage and abortion, but short on serious strategy.

Sean Collins
Shouting 'Liar, liar, pants on fire!' is not serious politics
The rise of a tyranny of fact-checkers in the US election, who constantly call out politicians on their ‘lies’, is a very unhealthy development.

Friday 14 September 2012
Tom Slater
Lawless: lots of gore, nothing more
Filmmaking duo Hillcoat and Cave aim for something profound with their gangster flick, but they end up producing macho escapism.

Neil Davenport
Whatever happened to Teenage Kicks?
As a BBC4 doc revealed, the Undertones had more freedom growing up in 1970s militarised Derry than teens do now.

Dan Travis
Andy Murray: it’s the technique wot won it
More major victories await the Scot, whose change of style as much as his shift in attitude is putting him on top.

McDermott and Derbyshire
Using science to freak out parents
A new book on ‘attachment parenting’ peddles the myth that there’s a right way to raise kids. PLUS: Parental determinism is neurobollocks.

Monday 17 September 2012
Patrick Hayes
Disagree with Nick? You’re a bigot!
Nick Clegg’s dismissal of gay-marriage opponents as ‘bigots’ reveals much about how the political class operates.

Patrick West
Latest Archers scandal: death of the author
The Archers poll was shocking not because it concerned abortion but because it asked listeners about narrative.

Mick Hume
Some truths about the Sun and ‘The Truth’
The belated backlash over the lies about Hillsborough appears to be more about today’s attempt to regulate the press.

Tuesday 18 September 2012
Jon Holbrook
In the courts, equality trumps tolerance
Four cases before the European Court of Human Rights show how the state puts ‘diversity’ before religious freedom.

Sean Collins
Giving the green light to grievance
The Obama administration seems to see free speech as a bigger problem than attacks on its overseas embassies.

Brendan O’Neill
What’s motoring this ‘Muslim rage’?
The Islamic world’s fury over a YouTube film speaks to something profound: the hollowing-out of the politics of state and diplomacy.

Wednesday 19 September 2012
Rob Lyons
Europe hasn’t yet
‘turned the corner’

As long as Eurozone leaders equivocate over the need for growth, Europe will lurch from one crisis to the next.

Christopher Snowdon
A run-of-the-mill
superpower

What is most striking about the US is just how unexceptional it is compared to other developed nations.

Mick Hume
‘Our liberal media is less keen on a free press than the Puritans were’
Mick Hume, author of new book There Is No Such Thing As a Free Press, answers your questions.

Thursday 20 September 2012
Tim Black
Capturing the moment the royals became slebs
Those grainy pics of a naked Kate Middleton tell a striking story about the celebrification of the Windsors.

Jason Walsh
The princess and the pornographer
Richard Desmond’s threat to close the Irish Daily Star is the latest blow in today’s war on press freedom.

Wendy Kaminer
The president who would divide and rule
Romney’s attack on ‘the 47 per cent who pay no income tax’ conveyed his contempt for ordinary Americans.

Sean Collins
The real losers in this election are the voters
Romney’s videotaped dismissal of swathes of the electorate will hurt him, but Obama remains a lame duck, too.

Ann Furedi
Right to protest, or just plain wrong?
Anti-abortionists should have absolute freedom of speech. But that doesn’t mean they can do ‘pavement counselling’ outside abortion clinics.

Friday 21 September 2012
Tom Bailey
Treating foreign students as second-class people
Instead of fussing over a few thousand non-EU students at a London university, we should open the borders.

Tom Slater
Doing justice to Anna Karenina
Not even Keira Knightley’s trademark gurning can spoil a fine new film version of Tolstoy’s classic novel.

David Bowden
The Thick of It: first as tragedy, then as farce
Armando Iannucci’s political sitcom has little profound to say about our bankrupt politics, but it is very funny.

Duleep Allirajah
The perpetual war against football fans
Today’s assault on offensive chanting shows that fans are still seen as stupid, dangerous hooligans.

Peter Sedgwick
Revealing the truth about psychopolitics
Following the death of Thomas Szasz, we republish an extract from Peter Sedgwick’s critique of anti-psychiatry’s leading light.

Monday 24 September 2012
Luke Gittos
Don’t criminalise teen relationships
The sex life of a teenager can be weird, but the plan to treat it as a potential site of domestic violence is bonkers.

Helen Reece
Domestic autonomy takes another beating
Nick Clegg’s expanded definition of domestic violence conflates vicious assaults with ordinary behaviour.

Frank Furedi
The intolerant war on ‘parochial pensioners’
In forever fretting about the ‘bigoted attitudes’ of ordinary people, Britain’s political class exposes its own prejudices.

Tuesday 25 September 2012
Barbara Hewson
Sarah Catt should never have been convicted
The case of a Leeds woman jailed for eight years for inducing her own labour raises some serious questions.

Patrick Hayes
The Dianafication of the police force
From police cuts to Plebgate, where does the Old Bill get off presenting itself as a poor little put-upon victim?

Tim Black
In the eyes of the state, we’re all plebs
The class worriers attacking Andrew Mitchell for using the p-word never raise a peep about other government assaults on us plebeians.

Wednesday 26 September 2012
Tom Bailey
What about a decent education, Nick?
The deputy PM should stop blubbing over his tuition-fees U-turn and provide universities that are worth the cash.

Rob Lyons
The Lib Dems: a sorry excuse for a party
In power, the Lib Dems have proved themselves as shallow and opportunist as the rest of the political class.

Charles Longford
South Africa: still an apartheid state
ESSAY: The roots of the Marikana massacre lie in the ANC’s deep antipathy to those it relied upon to rise to power: the black working classes.

Thursday 27 September 2012
David Bowden
Science theatre
on telly? No thanks

TV producers could learn from Carl Djerassi’s latest play, but should avoid the didactic nature of ‘science theatre’.

Tom Slater
Hollywood: you
can’t touch this

Schmaltzy French-language flick Untouchable beats Hollywood at its own game by injecting soul into proceedings.

Afolake Abu
‘Football fans are
not just sheep’

A WORLDbytes report asks why official anti-racism in football in on the rise when actual racism in society is not.

Duleep Allirajah
The FA’s anti-racist kangaroo court
He may be a thug, but John Terry’s showtrial shows how all white working-class people are now seen to be racist bigots.

Brendan O’Neill
Troll-hunters are the real menace to the internet
Yes, online trolls often ruin debates and annoy the hell out of people. But it is their censorious critics in the media who truly harm internet culture.

Friday 28 September 2012
Tara McCormack
A state-fostered climate of fear and loathing
A new book on criminal law in Britain persuasively argues that the more the state seeks to protect us from each other, the more we believe we have something to fear.

Peter Sedgwick
Revealing the truth about psychopolitics
Following the death of Thomas Szasz, we republish an extract from Peter Sedgwick’s critique of anti-psychiatry’s leading light.

Nancy McDermott and Stuart Derbyshire
Using science to freak out parents
A new book on ‘attachment parenting’ peddles the myth that there’s a right way to raise kids. PLUS: Why parental determinism is little more than neurobollocks.

Tim Black
The staggeringly pretentious footballer
The Secret Footballer reveals more about today’s elite loathing of football players and fans than it does the dark reality of the beautiful game.

Patrick Hayes
In the shadow of Harry Potter?
The anticipation has been intense, and the keenness to knock it has been widespread. But ignore the naysayers - JK Rowling’s first adult novel isn't bad at all.

Daniel Ben-Ami
The state is a bigger threat than the market
Michael Sandel’s What Money Can’t Buy has some useful insights, but its anti-market myopia blinds it to the corrosive impact of state intervention in our lives.

David Clements
What’s so great about the welfare state?
Defenders of the welfare state seem blissfully unaware of how it encourages growing numbers of people to become permanently entangled in a supposed ‘safety net’.

Pierre Desrochers
The real story of Silent Spring
On the 50th anniversary of its publication, it is clear that the success of Rachel Carson’s unoriginal, pseudoscientific book lies in its appeal to the anti-modern prejudices of our age.

Mick Hume
Why ‘Free The Press’ should be a battle cry for today
Mick Hume, spiked’s editor-at-large, explains the thinking behind his new book on press freedom.


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