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Monday 1 August 2011 August 2011
Patrick Hayes
E-Petitions: first as tragedy, then as farce
The resurrection of the idea that the UK's citizens should appeal for political change online confirms how cut off the elite is today.

Tim Black
Defending the right to be anonymous online
We should be able to use the web as we want, even if those who hide their identities sometimes act childishly.

Brendan O’Neill
‘Did I cause the Norway massacre? That’s just silly’
Thilo Sarrazin, controversial author of Germany Abolishes Itself, tells spiked that those blaming him for Norway are ‘insane’.

Tuesday 2 August 2011
Angus Kennedy
The elitist struggle against Mein Kampf
Why are some people so frightened by Hitler's book? It's so tedious the only thing it's likely to induce is snoozing.

Rob Lyons
Panorama’s addiction to pisspoor journalism
Last night’s edition of the BBC’s current-affairs show was a one-sided showcase for the anti-alcohol lobby.

Sean Collins
The real cause of the US debt crisis? Slow growth
The pantomime political debate about the debt ceiling is distracting attention from the parlous state of the productive economy.

Wednesday 3 August 2011
Tim Black
ASA and Ofcom: you’re not worth it
We don’t need quangos to protect us from ‘misleading’ L’Oreal adverts or bad soap-opera storylines.

Patrick Hayes
‘In the Public Interest’? Yeah, right.
A motley crew of left-wingers is using the fallout from recent scandals to grab a bit of influence for themselves.

Mick Hume
How British politics became trivial pursuits
What's really behind the summer headlines about David Cameron, that Italian waitress, Rupert Murdoch and Amy Winehouse?

Thursday 4 August 2011
Rob Lyons
Mubarak is gone, but Mubarakans still rule
The public humiliation of the former president is an attempt to show the New Egypt as free and over its past. But it isn’t.

Neil Davenport
When social mobility meant something
Stan Barstow, author of A Kind of Loving, captured the inner world of working-class people who left the mines behind.

Brendan O’Neill
The myth of a crazy,
all-powerful PC army

In a speech in Sydney, Brendan O’Neill called on critics of PC to stop playing the victim and to start acting like proper, self-respecting heretics.

Friday 5 August 2011
Viral Shah
Back at Ajax:
the Cruyff re-turn

The Dutch club’s most famous son has come back, but will his famously huge ego get in the way of success?

David Bowden
Caught in a web of love and lies
A Channel 4 film on Nigerian internet-dating scams posed questions about trust today, but provided few answers.

Tim Black
‘Man is more than an overdeveloped monkey’
Raymond Tallis tells spiked why he has declared a war of words on the trendy ideas that underpin ‘neuromania’ and ‘Darwinitis’.

Monday 8 August 2011
Jane Sandeman
They f*** you up, your Parenting Classes
Despite the views of the UK government, parents don’t need experts to teach them to care for their own children.

Heather Piper
Daring to criticise child protection policies
As a researcher into ‘no touch’ policies discovered, you criticise child-protection quangos at your peril.

Brendan O’Neill
Syria and the hole at the heart of the Arab revolts
Events in Syria suggest that nobody has the authority to resolve the Arab crisis – not the US, not the regimes, and sadly not the rebels either.

Tuesday 9 August 2011
Patrick Hayes
How the West hijacked the Libyan uprising
Libya’s National Transitional Council has been blessed by Western leaders because it is politically compliant.

Tim Black
Famine in Somalia: it’s not all about us
From climate change to guilt-tripping about donations, the Somalian famine has been framed by Western concerns.

Brendan O’Neill
London’s burning: a mob made by the welfare state
Yes, there’s a ‘political context’ to the riots: it is that British youth have been so suckled by the state they have zero sense of community spirit.

Wednesday 10 August 2011
Patrick Hayes
‘The police are just scratching their arses’
Patrick Hayes joined an anti-riot vigilante group in Enfield and discovered that they are not all racist louts.

Brendan O’Neill
This spinelessness is an invitation to riot
By shutting down normal life in response to some hooded youth, the authorities actually inflamed the instability.

Mick Hume
Why the police are in a state of impotence
The British authorities’ confused and fearful response to the recent urban rioting has exposed the crisis of state authority today.

Thursday 11 August 2011
Nathalie Rothschild
Making a crime of forthright criticism
A libel-court victory against a book reviewer who was ‘spiteful’ will have a chilling effect on literary criticism.

Dennis Hayes
Speaking freely in the Middle East
The Doha Debates suggest that people in the Arab world could teach Westerners a thing or two about freedom of speech.

Tim Black
Climate-change alarmism: you couldn’t make it up
Not content with haranguing us with The Science, now green campaigners want to scare us silly with The Stories of climate change, too.

Friday 12 August 2011
Hayley Watson
No, it was not the Blackberry wot dunnit
The smart-phone riots? Technology is about as capable of causing riots as a car is of driving a man.

David Bowden
Watching my hometown burn
Croydon-boy David Bowden reflects on a week in which his old stomping ground was back on the box once more.

Tim Black
Bigmouth tweets again
Ever ready with a quote from Kant, Joey Barton’s Twitter account confounds those who expect working-class footballers to be thick.

Brendan O’Neill
Never mind the looters, what about the ‘fascists’?
The moral assaults on the Enfield ‘vigilantes’ confirm that the cultural elite fears the white working classes more than it does riotous youth.

Monday 15 August 2011
Brendan O’Neill
These rioters are not ‘Thatcher’s offspring’
To blame neoliberalism (whatever that is) for the riots is to provide an Idiot’s Guide to Social Decay.

Mick Hume
Theatrical ‘fightback’ turns to farce
In their post-riot crackdown, the UK authorities looked like scared schoolboys acting tough once the fight is over.

Frank Furedi
Rioting in England: was it just a bad dream?
The elite’s claim that this was just another facet of the ‘culture of greed’ shows how incapable they are of addressing urban implosion.

Tuesday 16 August 2011
Neil Davenport
Schooled in
self-obsession

A teacher asks whether an education system which over-flatters the young contributed to the riots.

Josie Appleton
Policing the innocent, ignoring the riotous
ASBOs, CCTV, dispersal zones and a whole host of other petty powers did nothing to prevent the looting.

Tim Black
Attacking press freedom in the name of privacy
Having made private conduct central to politics, it’s a bit rich for MPs now to slate the press for being obsessed with private peccadilloes.

Wednesday 17 August 2011
Tom Slater
Clichéd encounters of the Spielberg kind
By paying loving homage to the movie-making era of ET, Super 8 only flags up its own lack of magic.

Tiffany Jenkins
How not to organise a museum
The new National Museum of Scotland is let down by the fact you can’t find the entrance let alone what’s in the collections.

Nathalie Rothschild
After the Arab Spring, the Israeli Summer?
Nathalie Rothschild reports from the Tahrir-style tent city in Tel Aviv, where a mish-mash of middle-class grievances is rocking Israeli society.

Thursday 18 August 2011
Patrick Hayes
Sterilise yourself and win a car!
The bribing of Indians to stop having babies is not that different to the moral blackmail used by Western Malthusians.

Tim Black
Why the US is still stuck in Iraq
The interminable occupation of Iraq exposes the crazy idea that Western forces can liberate foreign peoples.

Brendan O’Neill
Riotous youth: hang ’em high or hug ’em hard?
Why spiked is taking neither side in the great national handwringing over whether looters should get jail time or tough love.

Friday 19 August 2011
Patrick West
Love the music, hate the artist
Wagner may have been a vile anti-Semite and Bono might be a self-righteous plonker, but their music can still be great.

Duleep Allirajah
Kick the police out of football
If we’re serious about forging civic responsibility, then let's allow football fans to steward their own games.

David Bowden
Is it coz I is
David Starkey?

By blaming last week’s events on the ‘blacking up’ of white culture, the posh historian jumped the shark.

Rob Lyons
The state or the free market? What a choice...
Yes, capitalists are increasingly risk-averse and lethargic – but let's not fantasise that the state has the cojones to reinvigorate innovation.

Monday 22 August 2011
Brendan O’Neill
Burnt Oak: it ain’t all doom and gloom
Brendan O’Neill thinks a play about his hometown is overly concerned with titillating middle-class theatregoers.

Tim Black
There’s more to this movie than misanthropy
The critics leaping for joy over the sneering at humanity in Rise of the Planet of the Apes have missed the point.

Sean Collins
President Obama’s Summertime Blues
Yes, his approval ratings have plummeted, but Republicans shouldn’t gloat: Americans have had it with the whole political class.

Tuesday 23 August 2011
Brendan O’Neill
Society falling apart? Blame it on The Gang!
You’d never know it from listening to politicians or perusing the press, but there’s no ‘gang culture’ in Britain.

Mick Hume
A hole in more than a windscreen
What an act of petty vandalism on a Salford estate reveals about British society after the recent riots.

Frank Furedi
Cameron’s cure will make society sicker
The PM's post-riots promise of more intervention into troubled families is mad – it is precisely such intervention that devastated parental authority.

Wednesday 24 August 2011
Ellie Lee
The tyranny of parental determinism
The Lib-Con government is using junk neuroscience to claim that bad parenting causes all of society’s ills.

Rob Lyons
Health and safety gone mad? Don’t blame us!
The Health and Safety Executive loves peddling the myth that it isn’t to blame for our risk-averse culture.

Tim Black
Dominique Strauss-Kahn: a modern-day scapegoat
In the past, backward villagers would invest a goat with the sins of the village and then cast it out. Feminists tried the same trick with DSK.

Thursday 25 August 2011
Tim Black
No shooting events in front of the kids
Boris wants to stop yoof from watching Olympic shooting events because of their gun-glorifying effect. Is he joking?

Duleep Allirajah
England’s cricketers: good but not invincible
The test series whitewash of India shows England are a good team, but they haven’t got the aura of a great team.

Tom Slater
Taking the talent out of a music show
Sordid backstories, ineffably crap auditions and no Cheryl Cole – The X Factor’s back and it’s better than ever.

Brendan O’Neill
It’s a civil war, Jim, but not as we know it
The rebel forces in Libya have not so much won Tripoli as they have tiptoed into a vacuum left by the disintegration of the Gaddafi regime.

Friday 26 August 2011
Angus Kennedy
La mort de l’Europe
David Marquand wants to sound an alarm about the state of the EU, but his hostility to the ideals of the West only serves to express the cancer at the heart of the European project.

Tom Slater
A story in which everything has already happened
Julian Barnes’ masterful retelling of a life lived in retrospect is also an exploration of the human desire to give life meaning and order.

Tim Black
The unfunniest arse in God’s universe
This is a meandering, wittering book that claims to be about faith but reveals far more about its comedian-author Marcus Brigstocke’s nasty prejudices.

Patrick Hayes
A short history of predicting the future
Dan Gardner rightly skewers failed forecasts, past and present, but he relies on a few dubious ideas himself when he tries to explain why so many experts get it wrong.

Stuart Waiton
Glasgow: from industrial giant to traumatised child
Given that she has been a stinging critic of the obsession with self-esteem, it is sad that Carol Craig is now providing a therapeutic explanation for Glasgow’s problems.

Rob Lyons
The state or the free market? What a choice...
Yes, capitalists are increasingly risk-averse and lethargic – but let's not fantasise that the state has the cojones to reinvigorate innovation.

Tim Black
‘Man is more than an overdeveloped monkey’
Raymond Tallis tells spiked why he has declared a war of words on the trendy ideas that underpin ‘neuromania’ and ‘Darwinitis’.

Brendan O’Neill
Why the Third World poor must continue living in shit
A new book about the world in 2050 says explicitly what other green-leaning tomes hint at: that fixing global poverty will only harm the planet.

Tuesday 30 August 2011
Sean Collins
What the hurricane hype reveals about NYC
City Hall’s overreaction to Irene suggests New York City is losing its reputation for toughness and swagger.

James Woudhuysen
Anna Hazare: apostle of political hygiene
James Woudhuysen reports from India on why the middle-class warriors against corruption aren’t so heroic.

Jennie Bristow
These riots were not a product of permissiveness
Blaming the looting on the ‘liberal experiment’ of the 1960s is not only wrong - it could also make the real problems in urban communities worse.

Wednesday 31 August 2011
Rob Lyons
Do growing economies cause bigger bellies?
New obesity figures seem designed to scare us out of our greedy ways, and not just when it comes to what we eat.

Tim Black
The politics of fear blows into New York
The world’s greatest city was brought to a standstill not by Hurricane Irene, but by politicians’ worst-case thinking.

Brendan O’Neill
Libya and the shameless rewriting of history
The repackaging of NATO’s reckless intervention as a clever war for liberty would make Orwell’s Ministry of Truth beam with pride.


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