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Tuesday 1 June 2010 June 2010
Brendan O’Neill
A right ‘Carrie On’ in the Arabian desert
The execrable Sex and the City 2 offers an accidentally fascinating insight into the crisis of American values.

Rob Lyons
Let’s put the Gulf-spill crisis into perspective
To stop using fossil fuels because of one accident would make millions of people’s lives a lot harder.

Tim Black
Six-and-a-half billion reasons to be cheerful
Matt Ridley, author of The Rational Optimist, tells spiked why eco-catastrophists are so wrong about humans and our impact on the planet.

Wednesday 2 June 2010
Robin Walsh
A ‘second chamber’ of scientific expertise
In the past priests were forever poking their noses into politics to offer ‘moral guidance’. Now scientists do the same.

Thomas Deichmann
Germany and the politics of resignation
It’s a worrying sign of the times that more and more of our leaders respond to controversy by throwing in the towel.

Brendan O’Neill
Gaza flotilla: invasion of the moral armada
Everyone talks about the siege of Gaza, but a more profound problem today is the intellectual, moral siege of Israel by the Respectable World.

Thursday 3 June 2010
Rob Lyons
We should cut off more than their handouts
The monarchy should be abolished not because it costs a lot, but because it is a spent, Middle-Ages, anti-democratic institution.

Brendan O’Neill
Buy an iPad, kill a Chinaman
The idea that our lust for Apple products is causing suicides is anti-capitalism of the lowest (and dumbest) variety.

Nathalie Rothschild
Mamma mia, what double standards
It’s a bit rich for British commentators to be outraged over Berlusconi’s ‘gag bill’. He got the idea from us.

Mick Hume
The Laws affair: scandal ain’t what it used to be
When a minister resigns over paying rent to his secret gay lover, it is a sure sign that political life has slipped to scandalously low levels.

Friday 4 June 2010
David Bowden
The US: ‘smarting up’ popular culture
The plane-crash tropical island show Lost might be over, but US drama is still taking off – and the UK should take heed.

Duleep Allirajah
The World Cup: we believe we can flop
Behind the cheerful St George flag-waving, England fans are haunted by broken metatarsals and penalty screw-ups.

Ann Furedi
Gospels for the Godless
Pullman’s evil-twin version of the Gospels is an intelligent investigation of an age-old question: are Jesus and Christ two separate entities?

Monday 7 June 2010
Kevin Yuill
Is there a Derrick Bird inside us all?
Some have responded to the Cumbria massacre by calling for the kind of gun controls beloved of the Stasi.

Nathalie Rothschild
Rage Against The Zionist Machine
PHOTO ESSAY: A demo called ‘Rage Against Israel’ captured the apolitical, visceral nature of anti-Israel sentiment.

Brendan O’Neill
What the Israel-bashers learned from Bush
The international campaign to brand Israel a ‘pariah state’ is a shrill echo of what President George W Bush tried to do with Iraq.

Brendan O’Neill
Malthusians


Tuesday 8 June 2010
Rob Lyons
Why they love the ritual of recycling
The real purpose of recycling is not to ‘save the planet’ but to remind us how wasteful and destructive we are.

Emily Hill
Two Thunderbirds versus Colonel Blinky
The Labour leadership contest between Ed and David Miliband and Ed Balls is personality politics with no personality.

Wendy Kaminer
Learning the lessons of the Gulf oil-gusher
Of course the BP oil spill is not merely metaphorical, but it does capture something about the un-governability of modern America.

Wednesday 9 June 2010
Peter Taylor
Meet the green who doubts ‘The Science’
The author of Chill explains why he’s sceptical about manmade global warming — and why greens are so intolerant.

Guy Rundle
Holland versus the
un-Enlightened hordes

Guy Rundle reports from the Netherlands on how this small state has become bound up in a post-9/11 morality tale.

Mick Hume
What we’ve learned from the World Cup phoney war
In the first of his World Cup columns, spiked’s editor-at-large tackles some truths behind the ceaseless chatter before the big kick-off.

Thursday 10 June 2010
Patrick Hayes
Smile, the EU is watching you
EU officials are pushing through a directive that would give them unprecedented access to our online search histories.

Rob Killick
Why cuts are not the answer to everything
Here’s a quick history lesson about the state and the market for the free-marketeers in the Lib-Con coalition.

Nathalie Rothschild
The Flotilla Wars: one stunt begets another
Now, Israelis plan to sail a flotilla to Turkey to ‘raise awareness’ about the plight of Kurds and Armenians. The organisers talk to spiked.

Friday 11 June 2010
David Bowden
A teen drama aimed at kidults
Poor Skins: it’s been trying to provoke the Establishment for years yet keeps getting lovely write-ups in the Guardian.

Duleep Allirajah
Don’t you just hate armchair managers?
Ignore the know-nothings moaning about the exclusion of Walcott and the inclusion of Heskey. Fabio is on the ball.

Brendan O’Neill
Radical snobbery
Comedian Mark Thomas’s ‘People’s Manifesto’ confirms that no one is more suspicious of the masses today than the rump of the radical left.

Monday 14 June 2010
David Cowlard
A revealing snapshot of modern society
Exposed, a new exhibition at London’s Tate Modern, raises interesting questions about photography and privacy.

Tara McCormack
Welcome to Amnesty’s black-and-white world
The human rights group has a naive faith in ‘international justice’ and a simplistic view of high-profile conflicts.

Brendan O’Neill
The rise and rise of the Champagne Malthusians
spiked’s editor joined the population-control lobby in a posh church in London as they quaffed ‘luxury’ drinks and fretted about overbreeding.

Tuesday 15 June 2010
Nathalie Rothschild
Will Generation X ever grow up?
Noah Baumbach’s Greenberg is a heartfelt film about midlife crisis and relationships amongst an angsty generation.

Patrick Hayes
SCRAM: the ‘must-have’ accessory for boozy celebs
If the courts can now slap an alcohol-monitoring device on Lindsay Lohan, why not monitor everyone’s bad habits?

Frank Furedi
Why I will always stand up for permissiveness
The liberal commentators now deifying Mary Whitehouse are wrong to blame Sixties experimentation for contemporary decadence.

Wednesday 16 June 2010
Rob Lyons
Why we need a limit on drink-drive laws
Reducing how much we can legally drink before driving is an imposition on our freedom that makes little difference to safety.

Mícheál Mac Giolla Phádraig
Bloody Sunday: history reduced to psychodrama
The inquiry report into the Derry massacre rips events from their historical context: the conflict between Irish nationalists and the British state.

Thursday 17 June 2010
Tim Black
There’s more to innovation than cool gadgets
The launch of the iPad was treated as a Really Big Event, but IT and telecoms could do much more to transform society.

Mick Hume
Could we ban the endless drone of James Corden?
The chubby actor and No.1 New England Fan loves everyone except noisy, bantering, old-school supporters.

Patrick Hayes
BP: The dangers of going Beyond Petroleum
The world’s big energy companies need to realise that producing oil efficiently is moral purpose enough.

Sean Collins
Obama: the Gulf between words and deeds
Instead of all the dithering, lofty rhetoric and tough talk, the US president should be honest about the need to keep on drilling.

Friday 18 June 2010
David Bowden
A brief history of edgy entertainment
BBC4’s impressive Rude Britannia explored the tension between working-class fun and middle-class disapproval.

Duleep Allirajah
Vuvuzelas: what's wrong with a horny World Cup?
The sound of killjoys lecturing fans on how to support their team is far worse than that South African instrument.

Mick Hume
Not 1966 and all that all over again
The past weighs heavy on English football, and the current team will have to shake it off in order to succeed.

Monday 21 June 2010
Christopher Snowdon
The myth of the smokefree health miracle
The evidence that bans on public smoking reduce the number of heart attacks is still woefully thin.

Rob Lyons
Addicted to oil? What a dumb idea
The oil-addiction theorists are really disgusted by the desires of stupid, greedy, uppity consumers.

Frank Furedi
Why BP is not very slick in an emergency
When companies adhere to the rituals of risk-aversion, they lose sight of how to deal with real emergencies. Now we can see the consequences.

Tuesday 22 June 2010
Mick Hume
Boo to the Rooney-bashers
England’s finest footballer needs to be let off the leash, not lectured about his anger, language and beliefs.

AW Montford
Climate science after the ‘hockey stick’ affair
The use and abuse of a single graph to justify action on climate change shows the need for healthy scepticism.

Jennie Bristow
Sure Start: a fancy new way to police the family
Sure Start’s main achievement has been to transform the social problem of child poverty into an individual problem of poor parenting.

Wednesday 23 June 2010
Rob Lyons
The tyranny of the
anti-junk food crusade

The idea that thousands of lives could be saved if people stopped eating the ‘wrong’ food is pie in the sky.

Patrick Hayes
A ‘toffee-nosed twit’ with wacky views
Why has an anti-logic ‘stir-fry psychobabbler’ off the TV been invited into the upper echelons of Whitehall?

Daniel Ben-Ami
There is an alternative to austerity: economic growth
Neither the Budget’s authors nor the Budget-knockers have a vision for reinvigorating the economy. So here are my ideas.

Thursday 24 June 2010
Duleep Allirajah
Football: it’s a ‘head game’
As yesterday’s victory over Slovenia showed, England are a different team when they can play without fear.

Nathalie Rothschild
Protecting little Brits from the bogeyman
Home secretary Theresa May’s decision to ban a radical preacher from Britain is an insult to us all.

Sean Collins
Staging a mutiny in Rolling Stone magazine
General McChrystal’s anti-Obama blabbing to a hippie mag exposes the internal disarray of the US elite.

Mick Hume
Is it ethical to support In-ger-lund?
No, of course it isn’t - but so what? Let’s keep football out of politics.

Friday 25 June 2010
Alex Standish
Testing times for America’s school system
Leading educationalist Diane Ravitch rightly notes that for all the policy tinkering over how to teach and assess children, the biggest problem is the establishment’s inability to work out what they should be taught.

Tara McCormack
A far from innocent book about European guilt
Like the Daily Express, Pascal Bruckner’s sometimes shrewd take on European weakness is not without insight, but too often it descends into neo-con cliché and blind pro-interventionism.

Nathalie Rothschild
The dangers of international aid
Linda Polman’s War Games exposes some very big problems with aid missions in the Third World, but she ends up replacing NGOs’ black-and-white view of Africa with her own.

Tim Black
The barbarians are copulating at the gates
Eric Kaufmann’s hysterical Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? imagines that the crisis of Western liberalism is being brought about by fecund foreign fundamentalists.

Guy Rundle
Hitch-22 is more interesting for what it leaves out
Halfway through the memoirs of British leftist turned Bush-supporter Christopher Hitchens, the political narrative just falls apart. That’s fitting, argues Guy Rundle.

Rob Lyons
Down with the
doom-mongers!

With its intriguing reading of history and its positive approach to the future, Matt Ridley’s The Rational Optimist is a breath of fresh air in today’s smog of misanthropy.

Brendan O’Neill
The shallow socialism of hating Michael O’Leary
As evidenced in a new collection of his ‘wit and wisdom’, the cocky Ryanair boss both embarrasses his fellow capitalists and annoys the hell out of anti-capitalists.

Sean Collins
Why more really is more
For centuries, economic growth and mass prosperity were understood to be highly desirable, yet today these social objectives are under siege. Daniel Ben-Ami’s new book is a clarion call to begin a counter-offensive.

Monday 28 June 2010
Simon Davies
Google has become an imperialist beast
Simon Davies of Privacy International on why the internet giant keeps infringing people’s privacy.

Peter Barron
Privacy is a priority. Our business depends on it
Peter Barron, Google’s communications chief, says his company ‘bakes privacy’ into all its products.

Brendan O’Neill
Afghanistan: the politics of PR by other means
Recent events confirm that the Western powers’ main motivation in Afghanistan is not to ‘save the Afghan people’, but to save face.

Tuesday 29 June 2010
Brendan O’Neill
Africans: such childlike, spirited footie fans!
The idea that all Africans have a ‘rainbow continent’ duty to support Ghana in the World Cup is patronising guff.

Tiffany Jenkins
Arts funding has never been a pretty picture
Shrill anti-BP campaigners don’t realise that state funding for the arts is more problematic than money from Big Oil.

Mick Hume
England loses game – and all sense of perspective
Turning the defeat by Germany in a football match into a metaphor for society's ills is an even more risible spectacle than the England team.

Wednesday 30 June 2010
Rob Lyons
Is the climate around global warming changing?
Monday’s Panorama was the BBC’s most balanced look yet at the real ambiguities of climate science and policy.

Patrick Marmion
Welcome to Thebes: Africa as Western myth
Moira Buffini’s myth-inspired play about Western intervention would have been better based on the story of Narcissus.

Tim Black
Criminalising the rough and tumble of politics
The conviction of a black Bristol City councillor who called an Asian colleague a ‘coconut’ is a serious assault on free speech and democracy.


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