Home
Mobile version
spiked plus
About spiked
What is spiked?
Support spiked
spiked shop
Contact us
Advertising
Summer school
Top issues
Abortion
Arab uprisings
British politics
Child abuse panic
Economy
Environment
For Europe, Against the EU
Free speech
Jimmy Savile scandal
Nudge
Obesity
Parents and kids
Population
USA
View all issues...
special feature
The Counter-Leveson Inquiry
other sections
 Letters
 Review of Books
 Monthly archive
selected authors
Duleep Allirajah
Daniel Ben-Ami
Tim Black
Jennie Bristow
Sean Collins
Dr Michael Fitzpatrick
Frank Furedi
Helene Guldberg
Patrick Hayes
Mick Hume
Rob Lyons
Brendan O’Neill
Nathalie Rothschild
James Woudhuysen
more authors...
RSS feed
Monday 3 November 2008 November 2008
Thomas McMahon
The end of the world as spectator sport
While the economy crumbles, the views of the public are dismissed in favour of the anointed experts.

Phil Mullan
The ‘credit crunch’ and the SAD economy
The current economic crisis is a product of feeble political leadership and the hollowing out of Western economies.

Brendan O’Neill
Congo: pornography for misanthropes
Holocaust-hunters and rape-trawlers have besieged the Congo, where they ‘eat dead babies’, in search of the germ of human evil.

Tuesday 4 November 2008
Brendan O’Neill
Is America still the world’s policeman?
Forty years on, the US is still searching for a cure for its ‘Vietnam Syndrome’. But it won’t find it overseas.

Neil Davenport
A revolt of the masses against the BBC?
The 40,000 complaints over the Brand/Ross affair express our instinctive outrage against aloof, patronising broadcasters.

Mick Hume
Paranoid British fantasists for Obama!
Awaiting the US election results, liberal commentators in the UK have projected all their hopes and fears across the Atlantic.

Wednesday 5 November 2008
Guy Rundle
‘Hit the road, Jack’
Guy Rundle reports from outside the White House on the generous spirit of relief at the Republicans’ defeat.

Brendan O’Neill
A victory for passion over cynicism
The forces of democracy and anti-democracy were on full display in yesterday’s election.

Sean Collins
Three cheers for the 140million voters
The election shot down the stereotype of Americans as thick and apathetic.

Frank Furedi
Obama and the fall of ‘the silent majority’
The election of Obama brings to an end an important chapter in America’s culture wars. But will it create the space for a new political debate?

Thursday 6 November 2008
Brendan O’Neill
Michael Crichton, RIP
Farewell to the author who supported spiked spiritually and financially.

Sean Collins
The morning after History was made
Calls for ‘epochal Obama’ to get on with ‘ordinary politics’ show how small the political imagination remains.

Nathalie Rothschild
Obama’s foreign policy: it’s all in the family
The president-elect’s ‘exotic’ relatives reveal little about him, but may legitimise greater US intervention in Africa.

Brendan O’Neill
Voting for Obama: a badge of superiority?
Some of the celebration of Obama’s victory suggests America has entered an era of racial etiquette more than racial equality.

Friday 7 November 2008
Patrick West
World’s Largest Metaphor Hits Iceberg
The Unsinkable Titanic told the story of the doomed liner without the usual waves of misanthropy and anti-science.

Duleep Allirajah
Boring sport, inspiring sportsman
Formula One may be dull, but its new champ Lewis Hamilton is risk-taking and arrogant: just as he should be.

Philip Hammond
Darfur: the dangers of celebrity imperialism
Sending Blackwater to Sudan? The eccentric war-hungry activists of the Save Darfur lobby have taken leave of their senses.

Monday 10 November 2008
Brendan O’Neill
Obama and the new age of sobriety
Oliver Stone’s W reminds us of the almost Catholic levels of moral disgust that underpinned the liberal critique of Bush.

Tim Black
How to become the ‘British Obama’
What Britain’s political class seems to want is a vacuous, ‘authentic’ outsider with a talent for flowery rhetoric.

Mick Hume
Can Obama do it for Brown? No, he can’t
Amid the global outbreak of Obamamania, the desperate British political class seems to be suffering from a particularly acute case.

Tuesday 11 November 2008
Frank Furedi
Stop this primitive search for scapegoats
Everyone from ‘extreme capitalists’ to ‘the Jews’ is being blamed for the recession. This gets us nowhere.

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick
A Salvation Army without the brass band
Doctors should refuse to become the high priests of the new anti-boozing temperance movement.

Josie Appleton
Across Britain, police are behaving like gangsters
The author of a new briefing document reports on how drinking control laws give the police absolute, unchecked power.

Wednesday 12 November 2008
Alex Standish
Under Obama: no child left unmonitored
Obama’s plan to use education as a tool for social engineering exposes the elitist strain in his ‘Change’ campaign.

Guy Rundle
Puppydog politics and the end of left and right
Obama’s public discussion of the First Pet reveals his true strategy: to win America over by making politics boring.

Jennie Bristow
‘Baby P’: don’t turn this tragedy into a policy
Let’s stop the government from using this case as a springboard for spreading suspicion. PLUS: Ken McLaughlin on ‘scattergun social work’.

Thursday 13 November 2008
Richard Webster
Jersey: the fruitless search for modern evil
The writer central to exploding the myth of murder at a Jersey children’s home reflects on yesterday’s ‘revelations’.

Rob Killick
The Baader Meinhof Complex: hippy terror
A new film captures the tragi-farcical fate of the radicals who rejected capitalism and the working class.

Rob Lyons
Massaging capitalism rather than managing the crisis
Brown is proposing tax cuts in order to avoid making tough decisions about the economy. We should demand more honesty from our leaders.

Friday 14 November 2008
Mick Hume
Sharing out the squalor
Read Mick Hume in The Times (London) on New Labour proposals to keep council housing for the more ‘deserving’ classes.

Patrick West
A heartwarming display of class contempt
Channel 4’s Rich Kid, Poor Kid was a hackneyed examination of class warfare. But it was touching all the same.

Duleep Allirajah
It was only a goal celebration
No one got hurt. No crime was committed. So why all the fuss over David Norris’s celebratory handcuff gesture?

Ethan Greenhart
Is it ethical to buy a spiked t-shirt?
Our ethical columnist loses the plot over clothing that declares ‘Humanity is underrated’.

Nathalie Rothschild
Immigrants? Let them in
In discussing migrants alongside goods and services, Jason Riley allows the needs of the market to trump the case for unfettered freedom.

Monday 17 November 2008
Tara McCormack
Now, at last, we know the truth about Georgia
The myth of a plucky republic being ‘ethnically cleansed’ by an evil Russian regime was just that: a myth.

Tim Black
So, when will it be OK to mock Obama?
The lack of laughs about the new president-elect exposes the slavishly conformist nature of contemporary satire.

Helene Guldberg
Don’t outlaw boisterous banter in the playground
As Britain launches another Anti-Bullying Week, the author of Reclaiming Childhood says demonising teasing can do more harm than good.

Tuesday 18 November 2008
Ken McLaughlin
A needle in a haystack
Today’s blanket suspicion of what happens ‘behind closed doors’ makes it harder to spot real cases of abuse.

Jan Macvarish
Targeting teenage mums
Despite the fact his mother is 27, the case of Baby P has become an excuse to blame young parents for society’s ills.

Brendan O’Neill
Dead baby porn
The media coverage of Baby P has been a concoction of pornographic detail and coercive moralising.

Tim Black
Is it P for ‘prole’?
The death of one child is scandalously held up as evidence that Britain has a murderous ‘underclass’.

Frank Furedi
Why moral opportunists are exploiting this tragedy
The death of Baby P has been turned into a morality tale through which people can express their outrage and affirm their decency.

Wednesday 19 November 2008
Rob Lyons
We have nothing to loos but our chains
On World Toilet Day, a new film explains why universal access to sanitation is both possible and necessary.

Nathalie Rothschild
Waltz with Bashir: post-Zionist stress disorder
A new animated documentary about the First Lebanon War ends up psychologising a complex political tragedy.

Mick Hume
It should not be an offence to belong to the BNP
The furore over the leak of the British National Party’s membership lists ‘reveals’ some home truths about democracy as well as the far right.

Thursday 20 November 2008
Duleep Allirajah
Maradona: punk-rock footballing genius
The only thing more miraculous than his playing ability is the fact that Diego Maradona is still alive.

Patrick West
Stalin and Hitler were both evil? Go figure!
The BBC’s latest high-profile documentary on the Second World War finds a new way to tell us the blindingly obvious.

Brendan O’Neill
Barnardo’s bunkum
Do British adults really look upon children as ‘vermin’… or did the charity find what it wanted to find in its latest public survey?

Stuart Derbyshire
Let’s blow away all the barriers to stem-cell science
The windpipe transplant shows the potential of stem-cell medicine and the collaborative genius of human beings. We should build on it.

Friday 21 November 2008
Jennie Bristow
‘Just as bad as denying penicillin to a sick man’
As a medical student in 1968, Michael Crichton adopted a pseudonym to write a thriller about a young woman seeking an abortion, at a time when abortion was mostly illegal in the US. The book still packs a humane punch today.

Philip Hammond
The thin blue line between ‘humanitarianism’ and war
Conor Foley’s account of how human rights violations became a justification for launching wars reminds us of the need for a political critique of interventionism. Unfortunately, this isn’t it.

Tim Black
Outwitting our inner censor
From the Royus Chubbyus Browniums of the Greek era to ‘knock, knock’ jokes about 9/11 today, jokes have long been a way for humans to fart in the face of conventional logic, expectation and morality.

Sean Collins
The war on terror: a nasty, panicky failure
Jane Mayer provides a biting critique of the ham-fisted reaction to 9/11. But an effective opposition to the war on terror needs to criticise every aspect of Bush’s policy, not only the most unsavoury ones.

Rob Lyons
‘There’s a lot of rich people backing this cause’
A former lawyer for Enron, shocked to discover that his main job would be to help draft a global warming treaty, tells spiked that censorship and conformism are preventing proper investigation of climate change hysteria.

Kenan Malik
Twenty years on: internalising the fatwa
Kenan Malik, author of the forthcoming From Fatwa to Jihad, discusses the multiculturalism, political conflict and liberal cowardice that defined the Rushdie Affair and its legacy.

Mícheál Mac Giolla Phádraig
Making a living from attacking the IRA ‘death cult’
Henry McDonald’s historically illiterate account of the Troubles reveals more about the bitterness and prejudice of supporters of the Workers’ Party than it does about recent Irish history.

Frank Furedi
It is time to challenge the supernanny state
As the second edition of his hugely popular 2001 book Paranoid Parenting is published, Frank Furedi reflects on how official suspicion of adults and parental paranoia have deepened over the past seven years.

Monday 24 November 2008
Nancy McDermott
Babywearers of the world, unite!
Why did moms who carry their babies in slings or wraps react so badly to a less-than-reverential ad?

Stuart Simpson
Darling, it’s all about the global imbalances
Tinkering with UK tax rates and spending plans won’t solve the economic crisis because the ‘fundamentals’ are not sound.

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick
The ghost of the ‘refrigerator mother’
The author of Defeating Autism: A Damaging Delusion challenges the quackery and religiosity of the ‘crusade against autism’.

Tuesday 25 November 2008
Tessa Mayes
We need privacy and a free press
The actions of celebrities and journalists should be judged in the court of public opinion, not a court of law.

Patrick Marmion
Gethsemane: the devil’s in the fundraising
David Hare’s New Labour satire offers little but a moral condemnation of modern, pragmatic, pro-market politics.

Brendan O’Neill
A New York rebellion against libel imperialism
Brendan O’Neill meets the writers and publishers who have launched a war of independence from England’s ‘notorious, repulsive’ libel laws.

Wednesday 26 November 2008
Jo Herlihy and Tim Black
From the slammer to the clamour
Two new UK exhibitions show the imprisonment of society and the struggle for rights and freedoms.

Rob Lyons
New Labour: it’s not dead yet
Reports of the death of Blair and Brown’s post-political project have been greatly exaggerated.

Mick Hume
Strictly Dumb Democracy
In showing such contempt for the popular will, those dance judges were only taking their lead from ministers and officials in the UK and EU.

Thursday 27 November 2008
Dave Clements
Adopting an obsession with lifestyle
Local authorities should do everything to find children secure homes, not fret about parents’ personal habits.

Nathalie Rothschild
Prostituting women’s solidarity
The UK government’s call to British women to help combat ‘sex trafficking’ amounts to a crackdown on immigration.

Brendan O’Neill
‘We must avoid “mission accomplished” mentality’
The new president of the American Civil Liberties Union tells spiked that just because Bush is going, that doesn’t mean the fight for freedom is won.

Friday 28 November 2008
Mick Hume
Free speech for fools and scumbags, too
Merseyside far-right activists should not be arrested for incitement to vote BNP - read Mick Hume in The Times (London).

Patrick West
Survivors: we’re bad and we deserve to die
The BBC’s new series, in which millions are wiped out by a virus, is perfectly attuned to the gloom of the moment.

Duleep Allirajah
It’s grim up North London
While in Harry Redknapp Spurs have found a new leader off the pitch, Arsenal desperately need any sort of leader on it.

Brendan O’Neill
Mumbai: the nihilism that dare not speak its name
The terrible assaults on the Indian city of growth and ambition suggest that contemporary terrorism is not as alien as we think.


2017



November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2016



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2015



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2014



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2013



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2012



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2011



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2010



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2009



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2008



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2007



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2006



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2005



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2004



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2003



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2002



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2001



December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February

2000



December