October 2007

James Heartfield Monday 1 October 2007 comments

The high price of the UK’s housing shortage

While commentators speculate about a house price crash, it's the failure to build new homes that should worry us.

Joe Kaplinsky Monday 1 October 2007 comments

The dangers of lazy science reporting

When policymakers use 'science' as a shortcut to solving society's problems, we need to be sceptical about science stories.

Michael Baum Monday 1 October 2007 comments

In defence of scientific medicine

The government should give medical practitioners the tools to practice evidence-based medicine - and then leave them alone.

Tiffany Jenkins Tuesday 2 October 2007 comments

Give art a sporting chance

The diversion of arts funding to pay for the 2012 Olympics has caused uproar, and rightly so. But the art world has only itself to blame.

Rob Lyons Tuesday 2 October 2007 comments

...Jeremy Kyle?

The daytime TV host is a smug, self-serving idiot - but the real problem is the widespread contempt for his audience.

Neil Davenport Tuesday 2 October 2007 comments

Hat’s not on in this establishment, sir

Bars in London are telling customers to remove their hats - so the spy cameras can get a better look at them. Cheers!

Basu, Champion & Lasch-Quinn Wednesday 3 October 2007 comments

300: the use and abuse of Greek history

Zack Snyder's film is 'comic-book' entertainment, but that is little excuse for its xenophobia, amorality and inaccuracy.

Emily Hill Wednesday 3 October 2007 comments

Bloodless on the conference floor

Just when we thought the knives were out for Tory leader David Cameron, talk of an election has rallied the troops - for now.

Mick Hume Wednesday 3 October 2007 comments

Enough to tax the patience of a saint

If George Osborne's plan to reform inheritance tax is the Tories' big idea, politics is dead and buried before the election campaign even begins.

Nathalie Rothschild Thursday 4 October 2007 comments

Klara and Edda: banned at the Baltic

Censoring photos of children, whether smoking or belly dancing naked, is damaging to artistic licence and our own freedom of thought.

David Clements Thursday 4 October 2007 comments

Every parent matters?

The logical conclusion of the UK government's Every Child Matters agenda is to reduce parents to the role of 'partners' in child rearing.

James Woudhuysen Thursday 4 October 2007 comments

Sputnik: when American fears went into orbit

When the Soviets put the first man-made satellite into space, 50 years ago today, the event launched an era of US self-doubt that continues to this day.

Mick Hume Friday 5 October 2007 comments

Who embalmed the Diana crime drama?

Conspiracy theories in high places, why blogs won't free Burma - read Mick Hume's columns in The Times (London).

Duleep Allirajah Friday 5 October 2007 comments

Bless 'em, didn't they
do well?

As the recent World Cup showed, women's football has a long way to go to match the men's game. The patronising coverage won't help.

Patrick West Friday 5 October 2007 comments

The dearth of children’s TV: a homegrown crisis

Instead of resorting to cheap America-bashing, we should ask why Britain has failed to come up with a decent children's TV show since the 1980s.

Ethan Greenhart Friday 5 October 2007 comments

Is it ethical to use a condom?

Our ethical columnist on how we can make love while still loving the planet.

Frank Furedi Friday 5 October 2007 comments

A tyranny of experts

In outsourcing their authority to international institutions, governments bypass the democratic process and treat their publics as simpletons.

Neil Davenport Monday 8 October 2007 comments

A joyless depiction of the post-punk era

Anton Corbijn’s Control looks good. But it fails to capture the heart and soul of Joy Division, and the bleak-but-exciting era that forged them.

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick Monday 8 October 2007 comments

The Doublespeak of the Darzi review

An interim report on the future of the National Health Service is based on a profound misunderstanding of Britain’s current ‘health crisis’.

Mick Hume Monday 8 October 2007 comments

‘Bottler Brown’ — the PM British politics deserves

Some snap thoughts on the UK election that didn’t snap in the night.

Battle Talk Tuesday 9 October 2007 comments

A corrupt view of Africa

Video: In the first in a series of 'Battle Talks', Ceri Dingle of WORLDwrite says the idea that Africa is infected with political double-dealing is a load of 'corruptababble'.

Nathalie Rothschild Tuesday 9 October 2007 comments

China doesn't need the West in loco parentis

The C4 documentary, China's Stolen Children, showed that there's a patronising streak in some of today's handwringing concern for Chinese kids.

Emily Hill Tuesday 9 October 2007 comments

...paparazzi?

Freedom of the press is a damn sight more important than royal privacy.

Jennie Bristow Tuesday 9 October 2007 comments

This is not eugenics — it is one mum’s tough decision

The slating of a British mother for asking doctors to give her disabled daughter a hysterectomy exposes today's deep distrust of parents.

Kevin Yuill Wednesday 10 October 2007 comments

The (in)capacity to trust

The Mental Capacity Act replaces the freedom of doctors and carers to decide what's best for a patient with the clunking fist of legal decision-making.

James Woudhuysen Wednesday 10 October 2007 comments

Why greens don’t want to ‘solve’ climate change

Environmentalists are cagey about techno-fixes to climate change because berating mankind for its impact on nature is their raison d'être.

Nathalie Rothschild Thursday 11 October 2007 comments

Measuring the
mobile footprint

The live launch of the spiked/O2 online debate took a hard look at the impact of mobiles on the environment.

Rob Lyons Thursday 11 October 2007 comments

A trolley load of
food fears

Food is a source of sustenance and pleasure, yet today's foodie miserabilists treat it as a potential poison.

Brendan O’Neill Thursday 11 October 2007 comments

Mercenaries in Iraq: Dogs of Indecision

The most striking thing about the Blackwater scandal is the American state’s readiness to share its means of coercion with others.

Emily Hill Friday 12 October 2007 comments

Elephant dung, pickled cows and lightbulbs

A retrospective at Tate Britain shows that, while critics have little time for the Turner Prize, the British public love it.

Ethan Greenhart Friday 12 October 2007 comments

Is it ethical to watch sport?

Our ethical columnist on why there is little difference between football and bear-baiting.

Mick Hume Friday 12 October 2007 comments

Victory to the posties!

Support striking postal workers, and bugger the rugger buggers: read Mick Hume's columns in The Times (London).

Duleep Allirajah Friday 12 October 2007 comments

Cheering 'Colin Wanker'

Neil Warnock is outspoken, competitive and loves winding up the opposition: he's the perfect manager for Palace.

Dolan Cummings Friday 12 October 2007 comments

In defence of ‘radicalisation’

Critiques of Hizb ut-Tahrir focus less on its dodgy politics than on its intellectualism. But what’s wrong with a devotion to the debate of ideas?

Tony Gilland Monday 15 October 2007 comments

IPCC: the dangers of enforcing ‘consensus’

While appearing to be the ultimate experts on global warming, the UN's climate panel has actually distorted public discussion of the issue.

Frank Furedi Monday 15 October 2007 comments

And the 'Nobel Fear Prize' goes to…

Al Gore, scaremonger-in-chief of the green lobby, is a fitting winner of a prize that's long mistaken fear-makers for peacemakers.

Brendan O’Neill Monday 15 October 2007 comments

Al Gore’s ‘good lies’

When is an error not an error? When it’s in a film designed to raise awareness about climate change and make us change our behaviour.

Josie Appleton Tuesday 16 October 2007 comments

Eco-warrior vs Terracotta Warrior

A stunt to put face masks on the unique Chinese figures at the British Museum shows up the childish nature of climate change activism.

Maria Grasso Tuesday 16 October 2007 comments

The University of the Easily Offended

Meet the rugby-playing student at a London university, forced to recant after sticking up an 'offensive' poster advertising an English Party.

Helene Guldberg Tuesday 16 October 2007 comments

The myth of stressed and depressed schoolkids

If we’re not careful, claims that young people can’t cope with the ‘intense pressure’ of exams could become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Emily Hill Wednesday 17 October 2007 comments

Come on, bin Laden, make my day

At a debate in London, Martin Amis posed as the Dirty Harry of the Western liberal tradition, telling Islamic terrorists: ‘I want to be a target.’

Rob Lyons Wednesday 17 October 2007 comments

The dangers of fried food and a fried planet

Claims that the ‘obesity epidemic’ is as bad as climate change suggest that modern society is bingeing on scare stories.

Mick Hume Wednesday 17 October 2007 comments

You only Ming when you’re losing

The rise and fall without trace of another Liberal Democrat leader is symptomatic of our dried-up husk of a political system.

Vicky Francis Thursday 18 October 2007 comments

The Kingdom: big dumb fun

Look, if you want to know the history of Saudi Arabia, read a book. But if you want two hours of thrills, shoot-ups and car chases, watch The Kingdom.

Ceri Dingle Thursday 18 October 2007 comments

That's enough 'Corruptababble'

The director of a new film about Africa explodes the myth that the continent is sick with corruption and needs the West to cure it.

Nathalie Rothschild Thursday 18 October 2007 comments

...iPhones?

We should ignore the warnings of the environmentalists and keep playing those itunes.

Brendan O’Neill Thursday 18 October 2007 comments

‘Greens use rhetorical violence to silence critics’

Battle Talk: Dominic Lawson, former editor of the Sunday Telegraph, on free speech, environmentalism and the death of ideology.

Jan Bowman Friday 19 October 2007 comments

Why artists shouldn’t accept state funding

An illustrator argues that the cost of government funding - the loss of artistic independence - is too high a price to pay.

Mick Hume Friday 19 October 2007 comments

Hazardous whining is bad for our health

Defend the suburban wine drinkers, and don't zap the paparazzi - read Mick Hume's columns in The Times (London).

Duleep Allirajah Friday 19 October 2007 comments

A dirty tackle on the working classes

England's appearance in the Rugby World Cup final tomorrow has become another excuse for an outburst of class snobbery against football fans.

Patrick West Friday 19 October 2007 comments

TV repeats: thanks for the memory

As commentators moan that BBC budget cuts will mean more re-runs, the new digi-channel 'Dave' reminds us why some shows are worth a second look.

Ethan Greenhart Friday 19 October 2007 comments

What is the most ethical way to get rid of mice?

Mice are beautiful creatures, says our ethical columnist. If anything, it's human beings that should be 'got rid of'.

Faisal Devji Friday 19 October 2007 comments

The ventriloquist

It is striking the extent to which Bin Laden, celebrity terrorist of the MTV era, speaks through Western dummies rather than in his own voice.

Stuart Derbyshire Monday 22 October 2007 comments

Abortion: What You Didn’t Need To See

The Channel 4 Dispatches documentary on late abortion and fetal pain was a gratuitous and confused mess.

Ellie Lee Monday 22 October 2007 comments

Let us decriminalise abortion altogether

Did you know that abortion is still formally illegal in the UK? Here's why the 1967 Abortion Act needs to be overhauled.

Jennie Bristow Monday 22 October 2007 comments

Abortion: stop hiding behind The Science

With anti-abortionists pushing 'scientific evidence' on fetal viability, it is time to restate the moral case for a woman's right to choose.

Rob Lyons Tuesday 23 October 2007 comments

...packaging?

Why everyone is getting out of their box over the fact that some supermarket packaging can't be recycled?

Tim Black Tuesday 23 October 2007 comments

Knocking school sports for six

From football to frisbee, school sport is being stripped of its competitive element and turned into a tool for social engineering.

Mick Hume Tuesday 23 October 2007 comments

In Defence of Bad Losers

Should the England Rugby Union team’s ‘manly tears’ and Lewis Hamilton’s politeness really make them ‘role models’?

Tara McCormack Wednesday 24 October 2007 comments

A tactical re-treaty for Europe's elites

The debate about the Lisbon Treaty - the European Constitution rehashed - reveals how divorced European leaders are from the European masses.

David Perks Wednesday 24 October 2007 comments

Scientists should never be censored

In turning James Watson into a pariah, Britain’s scientific community failed miserably in its responsibility to challenge unreason through open debate.

Josie Appleton Wednesday 24 October 2007 comments

Don’t play the ‘offence’ card

The convenor of the Manifesto Club calls for a New Deal for public debate: Stop hiding behind cries of 'offence!' and stand up for your beliefs.

Dolan Cummings Thursday 25 October 2007 comments

Count me out of atheism's creed

The desire to belong has made atheism into its own religion. But non-belief is no basis for a group identity.

Brendan O’Neill Thursday 25 October 2007 comments

'New Labour is
allergic to fun'

Battle Talk: James Delingpole, author of How to Be Right, on the petty miserabilism of Britain's killjoys-in-chief.

Ethan Greenhart Thursday 25 October 2007 comments

Is it ethical to celebrate Halloween?

Our ethical columnist suggests that consumerism is a trick, not a treat.

Brendan O’Neill Thursday 25 October 2007 comments

‘Buy British’? A badly Soiled argument

Why should Third World farmers pay the price for the Soil Association’s ethical posturing on organic produce?

Josie Appleton Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Gaia theory: academic mysticism

James Lovelock’s Gaia theory started life as an interesting scientific hypothesis. A new book shows that it has since morphed into a mystical creed that sees Mother Earth as vulnerable and humans as wicked.

Daniel Ben-Ami Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Escaping the ‘Malthusian trap’

In linking population growth in Africa with declining living standards, economist Gregory Clark presents poverty as a natural given rather than a product of manmade underdevelopment.

James Woudhuysen Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Clausewitz after 9/11

The Prussian master's brilliant analytical method in On War provides richer insights into the contemporary wars against terrorism than anything his glib critics have come up with.

Kevin Yuill Friday 26 October 2007 comments

A killer argument against assisted suicide

In exposing the euthanasia lobby’s disregard for equality before the law, and for free will itself, Neil M Gorsuch has written the most important book yet on the ‘right to die’.

Neil Davenport Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Capitalism in ‘ruthless profit-making’ shock!

Far from being big, bold or original, Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine is shallow and simplistic, and reading it feels like being bored to death in a pub by refugees from the 1980s Left.

Sean Collins Friday 26 October 2007 comments

PC in the dock

Why did so many leap to the conclusion that white lacrosse players at Duke University must have been guilty of gang-raping a black woman? This disturbing book reveals how political correctness led to a disastrous rush to judgement.

Jennie Bristow Friday 26 October 2007 comments

After Chick Lit, welcome to ‘baby-sick lit’

The latest publishing craze – rapid-consumption novels about women trying to conceive – is not quite the literary cup of hot chocolate that was provided by Bridget Jones and the other zany singletons of the Chick Lit era.

Various Authors Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Five books on terrorism you aren’t allowed to read

Authors whose books on terrorism have been ‘erased from the map’ by English libel actions - that is, effectively banned in the UK - tell British readers what they’re missing out on.

Frank Furedi Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Is Israel the organ-grinder?

Walt and Mearsheimer are on to something when they say the invasion of Iraq was not in America’s national interest. But they’re way off the mark to claim that Israel and its agents orchestrated the war.

Mick Hume Friday 26 October 2007 comments

Ten days that shook the world

On the ninetieth anniversary, American journalist John Reed's pulsating first-hand account of the October Revolution remains a powerful antidote to our historical amnesia about what happened in Russia in 1917.

David Chandler Monday 29 October 2007 comments

Brown gives a whole new meaning to ‘liberty’

The British PM treats freedom as a stuffy British tradition, through which he might 'connect' with an atomised public. Thomas Jefferson he ain't.

Kevin Rooney Monday 29 October 2007 comments

Citizenship education: making kids conform

The UK citizenship curriculum is authoritarian, undermines independent thinking and it won't solve the problem of political disengagement.

Brendan O’Neill Monday 29 October 2007 comments

Why is Britain so
scared of Halloween?

Concerned Christians, police with helmet-cams, greens monitoring our pumpkin waste… some scary figures will be out in force this week.

Brendan O’Neill Tuesday 30 October 2007 comments

‘New Labour flushed liberty down the toilet’

Chris Atkins, director of Taking Liberties, talks about freedom, fear and how the government is making us all ‘stand in the naughty corner’.

Rob Lyons Tuesday 30 October 2007 comments

Toilets for all! A brief history of the WC

The seventh World Toilet Summit kicks off in New Delhi tomorrow, and its message is clear: people in the developing world need lavatories.

Frank Furedi Tuesday 30 October 2007 comments

David Cameron’s demographic determinism

In claiming the UK is overpopulated by migrants, the Tory leader has shown himself to be a fully paid-up member of the New Malthusians.

Nathalie Rothschild Wednesday 31 October 2007 comments

Pacifist-Imperialists vs the Saudis

Anti-arms protesters ask the war-mongering British government and our unelected queen to teach the Saudi king about rights and morality.

Mick Hume Wednesday 31 October 2007 comments

Saudi sheikhs star in
London panto

If an autocratic anachronism like King Abdullah didn’t exist, some human rights crusaders might need to invent him.