July 2006

Rob Lyons Monday 3 July 2006 comments

More pussycats than Three Lions

England are out of a World Cup they should have won. But don't just blame Sven – what about the players?

David Chandler Monday 3 July 2006 comments

Make lecturing Africa history

A year on from Live 8, Bob, Bono and the rest seem more concerned with bashing African governments than helping African people.

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick Monday 3 July 2006 comments

Big Pharma: a paper tiger?

From Hollywood to the broadsheets, drugs companies are depicted as evil monsters, convincing healthy people that they're sick. But they didn't create these 'worried well'.

Ed Barrett Tuesday 4 July 2006 comments

After Sven’s reign of error: what next for England?

England's 'experiment' with a foreign coach was neither a success nor a failure, but a continuation of what went before.

Brendan O’Neill Tuesday 4 July 2006 comments

A ‘shadow war’ performed for Western voyeurs

Why the Israeli-Palestinian conflict drags on and on.

Duleep Allirajah Wednesday 5 July 2006 comments

Suffering the penalty

Why England’s ‘golden generation’ turned into a bunch of bottlers when it came to spot kicks against Portugal.

Emily Hill Wednesday 5 July 2006 comments

A political nursery

Childish campus politics is a perfect training ground for the media-obsessed, censorious politicians of the future.

Professor Michael Baum Wednesday 5 July 2006 comments

What role for complementary medicine in treating cancer?

Leading British cancer specialist Michael Baum caused a storm with his letter criticising the NHS for spending money on alternative therapies. Here, he answers his critics.

Helene Guldberg Thursday 6 July 2006 comments

Don’t tinker with the libel laws – scrap them

No amount of reform will stop England and Ireland's stringent libel laws from having a chilling effect on free speech.

Mick Hume Friday 7 July 2006 comments

I’m sorry, but we shouldn’t make Rooney apologise if he’s not sorry

Read spiked editor Mick Hume's Notebook in The Times (London).

Philip Cunliffe Friday 7 July 2006 comments

Operation Restore NATO’s Prestige

The creaky North Atlantic alliance, a hangover from the Cold War, is intervening in Afghanistan in an attempt to save itself rather than the Afghan people.

Neil Davenport Friday 7 July 2006 comments

Heaven knows I’m an Islamist now

The nihilistic posturing of some radical Muslim youth echoes the teenage angst of British popular culture, from Quadrophenia to The Smiths.

Munira Mirza Friday 7 July 2006 comments

Why we should ignore Shehzad Tanweer’s pompous video

One way to deal with angry young Muslims is to stop taking their grandiose claims so seriously.

Mick Hume Friday 7 July 2006 comments

7/7: a year on, darkness and confusion still reign

The anniversary of the London bombings is not an occasion for silence, but for some overdue debate.

Josie Appleton Monday 10 July 2006 comments

7/7: a media memorial

The commemoration of the first anniversary of the London bombings was a spectacle conducted for the cameras.

Daniel Ben-Ami Tuesday 11 July 2006 comments

What’s behind the case of the ‘NatWest Three’?

Even if you think they’re just merchant bankers, you should be worried about the efforts to have them extradited.

Frank Furedi Tuesday 11 July 2006 comments

We need teachers, not amateur therapists

Schools have no business teaching children how to be ‘happy’.

Mick Hume Tuesday 11 July 2006 comments

What next for humanity? Closing the survey, opening the debate

As we publish the final contributions, spiked editor Mick Hume summarises the survey and highlights some themes.

A self-defeating argument for nuclear power

The UK government’s energy review is more interested in changing the public’s behaviour than in putting a positive case for nuclear.

Brendan O’Neill Wednesday 12 July 2006 comments

Do they hate Mumbai because it’s modern?

Some thoughts on this week's terror on the trains.

Duleep Allirajah Wednesday 12 July 2006 comments

Why ZZ blew his top

The soccerati’s search for a noble rationale for Zidane’s moment of madness typifies their silly quest for higher meaning in football.

Rob Lyons Thursday 13 July 2006 comments

Bin these authoritarian policies

The attempt to convict a mum of failing to follow new recycling rules shows that green policies are becoming ever-more draconian - and unpopular.

Mick Hume Friday 14 July 2006 comments

Take off your green-tinted glasses and get real

Read spiked editor Mick Hume's Notebook in The Times (London).

Neil Davenport Friday 14 July 2006 comments

Inviting Hindus to play the victim card

A survey of British Hindus reveals the extent to which multiculturalism fosters division and grievance.

Mick Hume Friday 14 July 2006 comments

The strange case of l’affaire Zidane

His headbutt might have been a moment of madness – but the storm of shrill reactions to it seems to have turned into an endless outpouring of crazed emotions.

Shirley Dent Monday 17 July 2006 comments

Turning 7/7 into a modern morality play

A children's drama about the London bombings is spoiled by the tick-tick-tick of politically correct boxes.

John Fitzpatrick Monday 17 July 2006 comments

A war movie with a difference

Ken Loach’s The Wind That Shakes the Barley, set in 1920s wartorn Ireland, brilliantly captures a community’s struggle to make and shape history.

Mick Hume Monday 17 July 2006 comments

Middle East crisis: what’s that all about?

A militarised mess has moved beyond the control of the Israelis, the Islamists and the international community.

Brendan O’Neill Tuesday 18 July 2006 comments

A level-headed guide to the Levy affair

Here are a few facts the police won’t be telling us about the background and consequences of the 'peerages for loans' scandal.

Nathalie Rothschild Wednesday 19 July 2006 comments

‘Truth, justice and all that stuff’

Superman returns - but why, and to do what?

Josie Appleton Wednesday 19 July 2006 comments

Missing the mark on the de Menezes shooting

As police are charged with 'health and safety' violations over their killing of the Brazilian, the whole affair becomes increasingly surreal.

Graham Barnfield Thursday 20 July 2006 comments

What’s behind the rise of Yob Lit?

Books on ‘anti-social behaviour’ tend to reveal far more about the author’s mindsets than they do about life in Britain.

Duleep Allirajah Thursday 20 July 2006 comments

After the head butt, the fallout

If Materazzi is punished for dissing Zidane, it could signal the beginning of the end of that venerable football tradition: ‘verbals’.

Jennie Bristow Thursday 20 July 2006 comments

Children: over-surveilled, under-protected

A recent conference in London highlighted the dangers of the government’s insidious monitoring of our children’s lives.

Barbara Hewson Friday 21 July 2006 comments

After D: antenatal diagnosis and human rights

A recent ruling in D v Ireland suggests that Irish women may be able to obtain abortion in cases of lethal fetal anomaly. Barbara Hewson, counsel for D, reflects on the case.

Mick Hume Friday 21 July 2006 comments

Hang on, who is Britain fighting in the Middle East?

Read spiked editor Mick Hume's Notebook in The Times (London).

Brendan O’Neill Friday 21 July 2006 comments

An explosion of pity

Faisal Devji, author of Landscapes of the Jihad, explains how the London bombers were driven by pity – that most 'dangerous and bitter passion'.

Dr Michael Fitzpatrick Friday 21 July 2006 comments

The trouble with autism-lit

A spate of new books confirms that making autism ‘fashionable’ is not making life any easier for the parents of autistic children.

Wendy Earle Monday 24 July 2006 comments

Can TV remote-control our kids?

Some claim the media make children fat and violent; others argue the media can help to make children more socially responsible. Both sides should get a grip.

James Woudhuysen Tuesday 25 July 2006 comments

The folly of carbon swipe cards

David Miliband is right: his plan for all citizens to carry around a card that measures their use of carbon will be seen as ‘burden’ by most of us.

Brendan O’Neill Tuesday 25 July 2006 comments

Blair, please save the Middle East – and us!

How the anti-war movement flits between telling Tony Blair to butt out of the Middle East and pleading with him to protect it.

James Heartfield Wednesday 26 July 2006 comments

Will Self’s mockery of the mockneys

The Book of Dave envisions a post-apocalyptic London, rebuilt along lines imagined by all those novelists obsessed with the seamy side of life in the capital.

Guy Rundle Wednesday 26 July 2006 comments

Euston, you have a problem

An Australian journalist asks why some signatories to the Euston Manifesto are discussing cricket, Dr Who, Sunday dinner – anything but Israel-Lebanon.

Mick Hume Wednesday 26 July 2006 comments

A bad case of imperial impotence

The Middle East crisis reveals that the USA, leader of the Western world, is suffering an acute loss of grip on global affairs.

Duleep Allirajah Thursday 27 July 2006 comments

A confusing cross to bear

Despite all the World Cup flag-waving, nobody seems sure what the St George's flag is for.

Nancy McDermott Thursday 27 July 2006 comments

Making sense of the ‘mommy wars’

Why has greater choice over whether, when and how to have children also led to greater anxiety for women?

Neil Davenport Thursday 27 July 2006 comments

Trial by TV and tabloid

Last night's BBC documentary The Boys Who Killed Stephen Lawrence showed that this tragic murder has been turned into a morality tale about the oafishness of the white working classes.

Mick Hume Friday 28 July 2006 comments

In defence of air-con, a cornerstone of civilisation

Read spiked editor Mick Hume's Notebook in The Times.

Mark Adnum Friday 28 July 2006 comments

A seamy side to Sydney

Cate Blanchett’s deluxe, blue-ribbon aura sits uneasily in gritty Aussie drama Little Fish, but the film’s still worth seeing.

Rob Lyons Friday 28 July 2006 comments

Blair’s unhealthy political vision

In a speech about public health, the prime minister declared open season on our private lives.

James Woudhuysen Monday 31 July 2006 comments

Windmills of the mind

Why the UK government's energy policy is more concerned with changing our behaviour and mindsets than with actually supplying more energy.