Home
Mobile version
spiked plus
About spiked
What is spiked?
Support spiked
spiked shop
Contact us
Advertising
Summer school
Top issues
Abortion
Arab uprisings
British politics
Child abuse panic
Economy
Environment
For Europe, Against the EU
Free speech
Jimmy Savile scandal
Nudge
Obesity
Parents and kids
Population
USA
View all issues...
special feature
The Counter-Leveson Inquiry
other sections
 Letters
 Review of Books
 Monthly archive
selected authors
Duleep Allirajah
Daniel Ben-Ami
Tim Black
Jennie Bristow
Sean Collins
Dr Michael Fitzpatrick
Frank Furedi
Helene Guldberg
Patrick Hayes
Mick Hume
Rob Lyons
Brendan O’Neill
Nathalie Rothschild
James Woudhuysen
more authors...
RSS feed
survey

abc def ghi jkl mno pqrs tuv wxyz index
Survey home
First thoughts
Final thoughts
Survey responses
RSS feed
Michael Baum
Gustav Born
K Eric Drexler
Marcus du Sautoy
Harold Kroto
Paul Lauterbur
Leon Lederman
Bernard Lovell
Sophie Petit-Zeman
Ingo Potrykus
Jack Pridham
Simon Singh
Jack Steinberger
Dr Keith Davies
researcher in invertebrate pathology at the Division of Plant Pathogen Interactions at Rothamsted Research, fellow of the Linnean Society of London, and former associate editor of the Journal of Nematology


My inspiration was most likely due to three influences.

  1. The influence of my father can be identified early on, as he had two abiding interests. First, he had studied timber technology at the University of Manchester, and was himself working in the timber trade. Second, he was an amateur radio enthusiast, who was always building himself radio transmitters and receivers. Very early on, I remember getting a present from him of two books – one on physics, and one on the botany of trees. He told me to read both of them together.
  2. At school, I was lucky to have a gifted biology teacher. Each week, he took one period and indulged us in his own particular interests at the time. He would pick a book or an article that he was interested in, and then for homework we would have to read a chapter and then discuss it in class. Books included The Theory of Evolution, by the evolutionary biologist and geneticist John Maynard Smith; and Beyond Freedom and Dignity, by the psychologist Burrhus Frederic Skinner.
  3. The other hugely influential aspect was TV, with programmes like David Attenborough’s The World About Us, Jacob Bronowski’s The Ascent of Man, and Bryan Magee’s Men of Ideas.

See Keith Davieswebsite.